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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Dorothy Royster Burwell, May 29, 1996. Interview Q-0011. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

The government's power to take homes

Burwell muses on the government's power to take away people's homes and livelihoods.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Dorothy Royster Burwell, May 29, 1996. Interview Q-0011. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

DOROTHY ROYSTER BURWELL:
They was taking all the land, very few people down that way had land left.
EDDIE McCOY:
How did they people that survived that stayed in Virginia, it was just that piece, just didn't have a flood, where the church was at?
DOROTHY ROYSTER BURWELL:
Yeah, Uh huh, just got lucky. But a lot of places, the water actually did come up further than it was supposed to. If you go down to Townsville, if you little place by the bridge, well, so far it had been lucky for the last couple of years, but that bridge was [unclear] out down there. Water come over, 'cause one, one man ran over in the lake down there, water came up one night. That bridge down there flooded, they mis-estimate the height of that bridge.
EDDIE McCOY:
When they was building it.
DOROTHY ROYSTER BURWELL:
And it used to be worse than it is now. Every time it came, rained two or three days at a time, that bridge would go out.
EDDIE McCOY:
You all have had a lot of hardships in this area?
DOROTHY ROYSTER BURWELL:
Oh, yeah, a lot of hardships, I tell you, whenever, whenever a person get a home, be well satisfied, think they, you know, then here come the government going to move you out, that's wrong.