Documenting the American South Logo
oral histories of the American South
Excerpt from Oral History Interview with George Simkins, April 6, 1997. Interview R-0018. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

The civil rights struggle continues

The civil rights struggle continues, Simkins notes. Schools have been resegregated.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with George Simkins, April 6, 1997. Interview R-0018. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

KAREN KRUSE THOMAS:
What kind of things do you think still need to be done? What do you think activism in the future will address?
GEORGE SIMKINS:
I think now, you're still fighting for things you fought for 30 and 40 years ago. These schools, for instance. People are talking about neighborhood schools now, and going back to segregation. A lot of blacks want neighborhood schools, because they claim it's unfair for their kids to be bused all the way to a white school, and a lot of the white teachers are not treating them the way they should. Some of them are segregated in the classroom. It's not good. I talked to a federal judge about a month ago, and he said there's more segregation in the schools now than there was before the Brown decision. I was really amazed at that. But it's going like that all over the country.