Documenting the American South Logo
Loading
oral histories of the American South
The Civil Rights Movement

The voices of the civil rights movement swelled into a wave of protest that profoundly changed America. This collection of interviews seeks to make this massive movement local and understandable by reducing it into its smallest parts—the people that participated, in small and large ways. These people were former slaves who taught their children the value of education, or high school principals who insisted on punctuality. Drawing together interviews from a variety of Southern Oral History Program collections, this cluster includes interviews with students and teachers at West Charlotte High School in Charlotte, North Carolina, where the successes of integration are encountering the realities of a segregated past; the difficult transition to integrated schooling for students at the all-black Lincoln High School in Chapel Hill, North Carolina; and the roles of black workers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This collection gives voice to the voices, loud and soft, of the movement to desegregate public life in the South.

1.
James Arthur Jones, November 19, 2003. Interview U-0005.
Native Americans and Integration in Robeson County, North Carolina: A principal remembers integration in a largely Native American community.
Interviewee: James Arthur Jones    Interviewer: Malinda Maynor
Duration: 01:34:22     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
2.
Barry Nakell, October 1, 2003. Interview U-0012.
Legal Defense of Native American Rights in Robeson County, North Carolina: A lawyer argues for Native American civil rights in Robeson County, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Barry Nakell    Interviewer: Malinda Maynor
Duration: 01:03:57     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
3.
Arthur Griffin, May 7, 1999. Interview K-0168.
Continuing the Progress Begun by Desegregation in Charlotte, North Carolina: Arthur Griffin reminisces about Second Ward High School in Charlotte, North Carolina, and reflects on the legacies of desegregation.
Interviewee: Arthur Griffin    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:33:14     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
4.
John Hope Franklin, July 27, 1990. Interview A-0339.
A Legendary Historian's Early Years in the Segregated South: John Hope Franklin remembers life as a student in the segregated South.
Interviewee: John Hope Franklin    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:00:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
5.
Robert Lee Mangum, November 18, 2003. Interview U-0008.
Christian Faith Drives Social Activism: The Reverend Robert Lee Mangum channels his Christian faith into social action in Robeson County, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Robert Lee Mangum    Interviewer: Malinda Maynor
Duration: 01:34:16     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
6.
Latrelle McAllister, June 25, 1998. Interview K-0173.
The Value of Integration versus the Value of Community: Values at Odds?: Latrelle McAllister remembers a nurturing, vibrant environment at West Charlotte High School and worries that this ethos may be at risk.
Interviewee: Latrelle McAllister    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 00:56:36     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
7.
Alice Battle, February 20, 2001. Interview K-0523.
Persistent Racism in Post-Integration Schools: Racism and segregation return to declining integrated schools.
Interviewee: Alice Battle    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 02:07:01     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
8.
Fred Battle, January 3, 2001. Interview K-0525.
Fighting for an Uncertain Legacy: Race and Rights in Chapel Hill, North Carolina: An African American man reflects on race and protest in segregated Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Fred Battle    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 01:13:25     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
9.
William Culp, February 19, 1999. Interview K-0277.
A White Teacher at West Charlotte High School: A white teacher recalls a harmonious racial atmosphere at West Charlotte High School during his short stint there in the 1970s.
Interviewee: William Culp    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 00:49:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
10.
Nate Davis, February 6, 2001. Interview K-0538.
The Persistence of Racism in an Integrated School: Segregation and integration caused difficulties in the life of this African American student.
Interviewee: Nate Davis    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 01:24:15     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 15 excerpts.
11.
Alma Enloe, May 18, 1998. Interview K-0167.
The Decline of the West Charlotte Ideal: Alma Enloe remembers West Charlotte High School as an extension of the pre-integration African American community in Charlotte.
Interviewee: Alma Enloe    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:03:46     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
12.
Burnis Hackney, February 5, 2001. Interview K-0547.
Integrating Chapel Hill Schools: From Personal Development to Academic Achievement: One of the first African American students to attend Chapel Hill High School discusses his continuing ambivalence about integration and its effect on the black community.
Interviewee: Burnis Hackney    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 01:34:32     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
13.
Ned Irons, March 16, 1999. Interview K-0170.
Learning about Racism as a White Minority at West Charlotte High School: A white student reflects on race and racism at West Charlotte High School.
Interviewee: Ned Irons    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 00:47:23     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
14.
Leroy Miller, June 8, 1998. Interview K-0174.
A Black Administrator Navigates Desegregation in Charlotte, North Carolina: A black administrator describes the intricacies of administrative changes during desegregation and how he brought his passion for discipline to Charlotte-area schools, including West Charlotte High School.
Interviewee: Leroy Miller    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 02:04:07     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
15.
Stella Nickerson, January 20, 2001. Interview K-0554.
The Uncertain Legacies of Integration: Stella Nickerson describes a harmonious segregated past replaced by a less desirable integrated present.
Interviewee: Stella Nickerson    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 01:12:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
16.
Raney Norwood, January 9, 2001. Interview K-0556.
A Frustrating Transition in Chapel Hill: A former student at Lincoln and Chapel Hill High School recalls the frustrations of integration.
Interviewee: Raney Norwood    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 01:46:07     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
17.
Willa V. Robinson, January 14, 2004. Interview U-0014.
Struggling through Integration in Maxton, North Carolina: Residents of Maxton, North Carolina, respond to integration.
Interviewee: Willa V. Robinson    Interviewer: Malinda Maynor
Duration: 01:16:04     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
18.
Angus Boaz Thompson Sr., October 21, 2003. Interview U-0017.
Stuck in the Middle of the Civil Rights Struggle: Fighting for Equality against White Obstruction and Black Accommodation: An African American activist fights for integration in Lumberton, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Angus Boaz Thompson    Interviewer: Malinda Maynor
Duration: 01:34:36     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
19.
Aaron Henry, April 2, 1974. Interview A-0107.
Race and Politics in Mississippi: Aaron Henry describes the role of race and racism in Mississippi politics.
Interviewee: Aaron Henry    Interviewer: Jack Bass
Duration: 01:28:07     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 15 excerpts.
20.
Orval Faubus, June 14, 1974. Interview A-0031.
A Southern Governor Reflects on His Legacy: Orval Faubus defends his legacy.
Interviewee: Orval Faubus    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 01:35:30     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 16 excerpts.
21.
C. Vann Woodward, January 12, 1991. Interview A-0341.
A Historian Reflects on Race in the South: Noted historian C. Vann Woodward reflects on race relations in the American South.
Interviewee: C. Vann Woodward    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:24:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 2 excerpts.
22.
Herman Talmadge, November 8, 1990. Interview A-0347.
Reflections and Resentments Regarding Race and Desegregation in Georgia: Georgia politician Herman Talmadge reflects on race in southern politics and the intrusive process of desegregation.
Interviewee: Herman Talmadge    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 00:50:19     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
23.
Hylan Lewis, January 13, 1991. Interview A-0361.
Considering Civil Rights before the 1960s: Sociologist Hylan Lewis describes his experiences with race in the American South in the post-World War II period.
Interviewee: Hylan Lewis    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 02:05:38     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
24.
Hodding Carter, April 1, 1974. Interview A-0100.
A Journalist Puts an Acid Tongue and Incisive Mind to Race in Mississippi: Journalist Hodding Carter describes the changes wrought in Mississippi by the civil rights movement.
Interviewee: Hodding Carter    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 01:36:09     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
25.
Richard Arrington, July 18, 1974. Interview A-0001.
The Slow Growth of Black Political Leadership in Alabama: African American Birmingham city council member Richard Arrington discusses the slowly increasing presence of African Americans on Birmingham's political landscape.
Interviewee: Richard Arrington, Richard Arrington    Interviewer: Jack Bass
Duration: 00:47:23     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
26.
Daisy Bates, October 11, 1976. Interview G-0009.
Leading the Fight for Integration in Little Rock, Arkansas: Journalist and activist Daisy Bates recalls working for civil rights in desegregation-era Arkansas.
Interviewee: Daisy Bates    Interviewer: Elizabeth Jacoway
Duration: 01:56:16     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
27.
Modjeska Simkins, May 11, 1990. Interview A-0356.
Fighting for Civil Rights before the Civil Rights Era in South Carolina: Civil rights leader Modjeska Simkins discusses race and civil rights before World War II.
Interviewee: Modjeska Simkins    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:29:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
28.
Stetson Kennedy, May 11, 1990. Interview A-0354.
An Activist Crusades Against Segregation in the South: Veteran activist Stetson Kennedy describes his desire to strike down segregation in the American South and some of the ways he translated this impulse into action.
Interviewee: Stetson Kennedy    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:26:45     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
29.
U. W. Clemon, July 17, 1974. Interview A-0006.
Evaluating 1970s Birmingham: Birmingham lawyer and politician U. W. Clemon describes his place in Birmingham politics and the city's continuing problems with race.
Interviewee: U. W. Clemon    Interviewer: Jack Bass
Duration: 01:00:31     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
30.
Arthur Shores, July 17, 1974. Interview A-0021.
Slow but Significant Progress in Birmingham, Alabama: Birmingham politician Arthur Shores offers his thoughts on the intersection of race and politics in his home city.
Interviewee: Arthur Shores    Interviewer: Jack Bass
Duration: 00:57:07     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
31.
George Wallace, July 15, 1974. Interview A-0024.
The Past, Present, and Future of George Wallace: Longstanding Alabama governor and former presidential candidate George Wallace discusses Alabama politics and racial issues in the United States.
Interviewee: George Wallace    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 01:39:59     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
32.
Guy B. Johnson, July 22, 1990. Interview A-0345.
A Southern Sociologist at the Dawn of the Civil Rights Movement: Sociologist Guy B. Johnson describes his path to sociology and recalls his participation in the Southern Regional Council in the 1940s.
Interviewee: Guy B. Johnson    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 02:03:25     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
33.
James Moore, October 16, 2003. Interview U-0011.
Tense Desegregation in Prospect, North Carolina: Longtime Prospect, North Carolina, resident James Moore recalls desegregation in that town.
Interviewee: James Moore    Interviewer: Malinda Maynor
Duration: 00:15:41     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 2 excerpts.
34.
Sheila Florence, January 20, 2001. Interview K-0544.
The Trial of Desegregating Chapel Hill High School: Sheila Florence, among the first African Americans to desegregate Chapel Hill High School in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, remembers growing up in the segregated South and working to end desegregation.
Interviewee: Sheila Florence    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 01:39:54     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
35.
Kathryn Cheek, March 27, 2003. Interview K-0203.
Fear and Violence in Desegregating Chapel Hill: One White Girl's Experience: A white student remembers fear and violence during desegregation in Chapel Hill.
Interviewee: Kathryn Cheek    Interviewer: Susan Upton
Duration: 00:30:58     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
36.
Robert Yost, November 22, 2000. Interview K-0487.
Chess and English at West Charlotte High School: Robert Yost discusses coaching chess and teaching English at West Charlotte High School in Charlotte, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Robert Yost    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:34:12     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
37.
Edwin Caldwell, March 2, 2001. Interview K-0202.
A Political Organizer Becomes a Politician: Edwin Caldwell recalls a lifetime of political organization and advocacy.
Interviewee: Edwin Caldwell    Interviewer: Oliver White
Duration: 02:59:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
38.
Glennon Threatt, June 16, 2005. Interview U-0023.
Academic Success and Persistent Segregation in Birmingham, Alabama: A Birmingham lawyer shares his reflections on segregation in Birmingham, Alabama, and racism in the United States.
Interviewee: Glennon Threatt    Interviewer: Kimberly Hill
Duration: 01:35:07     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
39.
Thurman Couch, February 12, 2001. Interview K-0537.
New Challenges for the African American Community in an Integrated Chapel Hill: Thurman Couch describes social, cultural, and economic splintering in African American networks in Chapel Hill following integration.
Interviewee: Thurman Couch    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 01:02:34     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 15 excerpts.
40.
Jeff Black, March 29, 1999. Interview K-0276.
Individuality Meets Diversity at West Charlotte High School: Jeff Black reflects on the legacies of desegregation at West Charlotte High School, a school hailed as an exemplar of successful desegregation.
Interviewee: Jeff Black    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 00:43:26     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
41.
Rebecca Clark, June 21, 2000. Interview K-0536.
Earning and Buying in Jim Crow North Carolina: Rebecca Clark describes the economic impact of Jim Crow: denying African Americans desirable jobs, forcing them into low-paying jobs, and humiliating African American consumers.
Interviewee: Rebecca Clark    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 03:18:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
42.
Joanne Peerman, February 24, 2001. Interview K-0557.
Pushing for Integration at Chapel Hill High School: Joanne Peerman describes the efforts of black students to thoroughly integrate Chapel Hill High School and discusses her relationship with her father, a beloved coach at Lincoln High School and a powerful figure in the black high school community.
Interviewee: Joanne Peerman    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 01:33:45     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 18 excerpts.
43.
Gloria Register Jeter, December 23, 2000. Interview K-0549.
The Shortcomings of Integration: Integration was incomplete and did little to rid schools of racism, maintains Gloria Register Jeter in this interview. The close ties between school and community that existed in segregated black Chapel Hill evaporated when black schools were absorbed into a system that Jeter believed had little interest in black students' success.
Interviewee: Gloria Register Jeter    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 01:24:36     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 15 excerpts.
44.
Carrie Abramson, February 21, 1999. Interview K-0275.
Incomplete Integration at West Charlotte High School: A white student's experience with racial division at West Charlotte convinces her of the importance of integrated education.
Interviewee: Carrie Abramson    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:02:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
45.
William Hamlin, May 29, 1998. Interview K-0169.
Cultural Pluralism versus Integration at West Charlotte High School: Former West Charlotte student muses about the school and the uncertain legacies of integration.
Interviewee: William Hamlin    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:34:12     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
46.
Saundra Davis, May 12, 1998. Interview K-0278.
Support for West Charlotte, Concerns about Integration: Enthusiasm for West Charlotte High School clashes with uncertainty about the efficacy of integration.
Interviewee: Saundra Davis    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:13:04     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
47.
Harriet Gentry Love, June 17, 1998. Interview K-0171.
Reflections on Community, Family, and West Charlotte High School: Harriet Love shares memories of and fondness for West Charlotte, a truly unique school.
Interviewee: Harriet Gentry Love    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:12:05     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
48.
John Love, February 17, 1999. Interview K-0172.
Culture, Race, and Belonging at West Charlotte High School: Former student remembers West Charlotte High as a place where diversity created both opportunity and conflict.
Interviewee: John Love    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:17:09     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
49.
Rita Jackson Samuels, April 30, 1974. Interview A-0077.
The Growing Presence of African Americans in Georgia's Government: Rita Jackson Samuels, coordinator of the Governor's Council on Human Relations in Atlanta, Georgia, describes her role in expanding the presence of African Americans in Georgia's state government.
Interviewee: Rita Jackson Samuels    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 00:47:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
50.
Carnell Locklear, February 24, 2004. Interview U-0007.
A Struggling Movement Fights for Lumbee Rights: Carnell Locklear recalls his fight for Lumbee Native American rights in eastern North Carolina in the 1970s and 1980s.
Interviewee: Carnell Locklear    Interviewer: Malinda Maynor, Willie Lowery
Duration: 00:59:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
51.
Elizabeth Brown, June 17, 2005. Interview U-0019.
Successful Integration, Uncertain Legacy: Integration in Birmingham, Alabama: Elizabeth Brown, a white teacher who taught at John Carroll High School in Birmingham, Alabama, describes desegregation and its legacies in her city.
Interviewee: Elizabeth Brown    Interviewer: Kimberly Hill
Duration: 01:56:22     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
52.
Howell Heflin, July 9, 1974. Interview A-0010.
A Changing Judiciary in Alabama: Howell Heflin, who sat on the Alabama State Supreme Court in the 1970s before a two-decade tenure in the United States Senate, discusses the post-segregation Alabama judiciary.
Interviewee: Howell Heflin    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 01:11:49     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
53.
Virginia Foster Durr, February 6, 1991. Interview A-0337.
The Early Stages of the Civil Rights Movement: Civil rights activist Virginia Foster Durr describes her involvement in the nascent civil rights movement of the 1940s and 1950s.
Interviewee: Virginia Foster Durr    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:32:35     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
54.
Madge Hopkins, October 17, 2000. Interview K-0481.
Watching the Desegregation Process at West Charlotte High School: Madge Hopkins, a graduate of West Charlotte High School and the vice principal of the school at the time of the interview, describes her experiences with segregation and school desegregation in Charlotte, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Madge Hopkins    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:04:14     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
55.
Walter Durham, January 19 and 26, 2001. Interview K-0540.
An African American Response to the Process and Consequences of School Integration: Walter Durham discusses coming of age during the 1950s and 1960s in Orange County, North Carolina. Durham focuses especially on the process of school integration as it occurred in the merging of the all black Lincoln High School and the newly integrated Chapel Hill High School. According to Durham, this was a tense process in which many of the school traditions he fondly remembers from his days at Lincoln were lost in the transition to integrated schools.
Interviewee: Walter Durham    Interviewer: Bob Gilgor
Duration: 02:11:25     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
56.
Lyman Johnson, July 12, 1990. Interview A-0351.
Civil Rights Battles in a Progressive Southern City: Lyman Johnson traces his lifelong pursuit of racial equality through his father's rejection of racial hierarchies, his experiences as an educated black Navy solder, his observations of racial violence, and his efforts to get equal pay and union representation for Louisville teachers.
Interviewee: Lyman Johnson    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:03:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
57.
Paul Hardin Jr., December 8, 1989. Interview C-0071.
Integration of the United Methodist Church: Bishop Paul Hardin helped bring about racial integration of the United Methodist denomination in the 1960s. He recalls several points in his long ministry career when white and black pastors opposed his efforts to move ministers to other districts, accept church members of other races, and dissolve the Black Methodist district. Supportive church members helped him withstand criticism of his personal stance, even when he faced pressure from conservative ministers on one side and Martin Luther King on the other.
Interviewee: Paul Hardin    Interviewer: Donald Mathews
Duration: 01:23:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
58.
Septima Poinsette Clark, July 30, 1976. Interview G-0017.
Effective Strategies and Leadership in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference: Septima Clark describes the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in the late 1950s to mid 1960s, especially the community education programs that she directed for the SCLC and the Highlander Folk School. She rejoices in the new voters and civil rights legislation that resulted from their work but noticed drawbacks arising from prejudice against female leaders, disdain for the poor, and clashes in leadership styles.
Interviewee: Septima Poinsette Clark    Interviewer: Eugene Walker
Duration: 01:26:08     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
59.
James Atwater, February 28, 2001. Interview K-0201.
Segregation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina: James Atwater discusses life in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, from the 1930s to the 1950s. He describes the black community, the impact of segregation on schools and neighborhoods, and experiences of African American staff at the university.
Interviewee: James Atwater    Interviewer: Jennifer Nardone
Duration: 01:18:24     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
60.
Harold Fleming, January 24, 1990. Interview A-0363.
The Southern Regional Council Addresses Racial Prejudice and Fear in the 1940s and 1950s: Harold Fleming recounts how he became involved with the Southern Regional Council (SRC) and the criticism he faced for opposing racism in the 1940s and 1950s. He describes the effect of the Red Scare on limiting the involvement of racial progressives in the organizations like the SRC. Additionally, Fleming compares the leadership styles of those he encountered within the organization.
Interviewee: Harold Fleming    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 02:05:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 15 excerpts.
61.
Cornelia Spencer Love, January 26, 1975. Interview G-0032.
A Chapel Hill Daughter Returns: Cornelia Spencer Love, granddaughter of Cornelia Phillips Spencer and sister of Burlington Industries founder J. Spencer Love, discusses her long relationship with the University of North Carolina, the town of Chapel Hill, and its black community.
Interviewee: Cornelia Spencer Love    Interviewer: Lee Kessler
Duration: 01:39:39     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
62.
Andrew Young, January 31, 1974. Interview A-0080.
An African American Congressman from Georgia Remembers Changing Race Relations During the Civil Rights Movement: Andrew Young, the first African American congressman from Georgia since Reconstruction, describes his involvement in the early civil rights movement. After dedicating much time and energy to voter registration drives as a minister in Georgia, Young later entered politics and was first elected to Congress in 1972. Young cites the Voting Rights Act of 1965 as the decisive turning point in race relations and argues that it was this access to political power that allowed African Americans to bring to fruition other advances they had made in education, business, and social standing.
Interviewee: Andrew Young    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 00:42:21     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
63.
James P. Coleman, September 5, 1990. Interview A-0338.
Former Attorney General and Governor of Mississippi Discusses Race and Politics: Former attorney general and governor of Mississippi James P. Coleman discusses his role in southern politics from the 1930s through the 1960s. Coleman focuses specifically on the issue of racial segregation and its impact on Mississippi politics.
Interviewee: James P. Coleman    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 00:46:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
64.
Richard Bowman, July 8, 1998. Interview K-0513.
An Asheville Native Describes Segregation and Racism in North Carolina and California: Richard Bowman reflects on growing up in segregated Asheville, North Carolina, and facing racism during his employment with the army and the Los Angeles Department of Motor Vehicles. He also discusses his work to improve the current Asheville school district and rebuild his old high school. He lived in Los Angeles for four decades and experienced two major riots.
Interviewee: Richard Bowman, Richard Bowman    Interviewer: Kelly Navies
Duration: 01:27:26     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 15 excerpts.
65.
Leslie W. Dunbar, December 18, 1978. Interview G-0075.
Former Director of the Southern Regional Council Describes His Role in the Civil Rights Movement: Former executive director of the Southern Regional Council (SRC) Leslie Dunbar discusses his involvement in the civil rights movement, focusing on changes that occurred in the early 1960s. Dunbar describes the SRC as an organization dedicated to changing people's attitudes about race. He emphasizes the SRC's attempts to work with the federal government—particularly the Kennedy administration—and other civil rights organizations, especially in the Voter Education Program.
Interviewee: Leslie W. Dunbar    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, Helen Bresler
Duration: 03:34:07     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
66.
Septima Poinsette Clark, July 25, 1976. Interview G-0016.
Educator and Activist Works for Civil Rights in South Carolina: Septima Clark served as a board member and education director for the Highlander Folk School and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the 1950s and 1960s. She links her activism to the memory of her parents' struggles with poverty and racism. She also describes how community relations functioned within the NAACP and SCLC. Her plans for increasing community involvement, protecting the labor rights of black teachers, and educating black voters were often ignored because she was female. She discusses why these types of gender roles persisted in the SCLC and the role of leaders in the black community.
Interviewee: Septima Poinsette Clark    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 03:46:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 19 excerpts.
67.
Viola Turner, April 15, 1979. Interview C-0015.
From Macon, Georgia, to Durham, North Carolina: An African American Woman Remembers Her Childhood and Early Adult Years in the South: Viola Turner, who served as treasurer of North Carolina Mutual Insurance Company, describes her childhood in Macon, Georgia, and her experiences in Durham, North Carolina. In remembering her life experiences in the early twentieth century, she focuses particularly on education, race relations, the importance of skin color, and segregation in business and leisure activities in the South.
Interviewee: Viola Turner    Interviewer: Walter Weare
Duration: 03:52:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
68.
Elizabeth Brooks, October 2, 1974. Interview E-0058.
An African American Woman Discusses Her Role in the UNC Food Workers Strike of 1969: Elizabeth Brooks was one of the leaders of the UNC Food Workers Strike of 1969. As a new worker in the Lenoir Dining Hall, Brooks helped to organize the food workers with the help of Preston Dobbins and the Black Student Movement. This interview focuses on the first strike, which was sparked by the unexpected firing of one worker, low wages, and withheld back pay for overtime.
Interviewee: Elizabeth Brooks    Interviewer: Beverly Jones
Duration: 01:04:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
69.
H. M. Michaux, November 20, 1974. Interview A-0135.
The Influence of Black Electoral Politics in North Carolina's Government: H. M. Michaux, a Durham, North Carolina, state representative, describes the role of black electoral politics in North Carolina's state government. He reflects on staying power of the Republican Party in southern politics.
Interviewee: H. M. Michaux    Interviewer: Jack Bass
Duration: 01:15:27     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
70.
William Gordon, January 19, 1991. Interview A-0364.
An African American Journalist Describes His Views on Segregation and Race Relations in the South: African American journalist William Gordon recalls growing up in the rural South in the 1920s and 1930s. He describes his relationship with civil rights advocates such as Ralph McGill and Herman Talmadge, and explains his perspective on changing race relations and the fall of Jim Crow segregation.
Interviewee: William Gordon    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:24:03     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
71.
Clark Foreman, November 16, 1974. Interview B-0003.
Civil Rights Advocate Discusses his Work with the Roosevelt Administration and Civil Rights Organizations: Clark Foreman worked in the Atlanta Commission on Interracial Cooperation, the Roosevelt Administration, and the Southern Conference for Human Welfare from the 1920s through the 1940s. This interview traces his efforts to provide equal social services and political rights for African Americans through these organizations and explains how he developed these goals. He also discusses his travels in Europe, his work with Black Mountain College and organized labor, and his criticism of the Red Scare.
Interviewee: Clark Foreman    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, William Finger
Duration: 04:55:32     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
72.
Moon Landrieu, January 10-11, 1974. Interview A-0089.
New Orleans Mayor Moon Landrieu Surveys the Changing Political Landscape: New Orleans Mayor Moon Landrieu describes the changing political landscape of the Crescent City following World War II through his tenure as mayor in the 1970s. Stressing the importance of voter registration and the appointment of African American public officials, Landrieu emphasizes the role of political leadership in effecting real change in New Orleans race relations during the long years of the civil rights movement.
Interviewee: Moon Landrieu    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 01:23:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
73.
Terry Sanford, [date unknown]. Interview A-0140.
A Southern Governor's Reflections on North Carolina Politics: Terry Sanford recalls his political career as a Democratic governor of North Carolina. He discusses the impact of race on southern politics and the realignment of political parties in the late twentieth century. Sanford attempts to reject the image of southern exceptionalism.
Interviewee: Terry Sanford    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 02:02:19     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
74.
Frances Pauley, July 18, 1974. Interview G-0046.
A White Southern Woman Describes Her Involvement in the Civil Rights Movement: Frances Pauley was born and raised in Decatur, Georgia, during the early twentieth century. An advocate for the poor and of racial integration, Pauley served as president of the Georgia League of Women Voters in the 1940s and 1950s, where she focused specifically on integration of public schools. In 1960, she became director of the Georgia Council on Human Relations and worked within the civil rights movement to promote African American leadership and interracial organizations.
Interviewee: Frances Pauley    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:56:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
75.
Virginia Foster Durr, March 13, 14, 15, 1975. Interview G-0023-1.
Emerging from a Cocoon: How Virginia Foster Durr Became a Civil Rights Activist: Virginia Foster Durr discusses her early life and how she became aware of the social justice problems plaguing twentieth-century America. In this first part of a three-interview series, Durr describes her life on the plantation when she was a child; race issues in Birmingham, where she grew up; and how her views began to change when she left Birmingham to attend Wellesley College.
Interviewee: Virginia Foster Durr    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, Sue Thrasher
Duration: 06:16:45     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 39 excerpts.
76.
Calvin Kytle, January 19, 1991. Interview A-0365.
Southern Husband and Wife Discuss the Issues and Leaders of Civil Rights in Georgia Following World War II: Calvin and Elizabeth Kytle, both born and raised in the South, held liberal views on race issues and supported civil rights. Here, they describe their perceptions of race problems and their thoughts on the actions of various leaders and politicians, ranging from pro-segregationists to racial moderates to civil rights activists.
Interviewee: Calvin Kytle    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:18:52     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
77.
John Ivey, July 21, 1990. Interview A-0360.
Southern Sociologist Describes the Southern Regional Education Board: John Ivey received his doctoral degree in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1944. He and his wife, Melville Corbett Ivey, describe their interaction with such leading figures as Howard Odum, Rupert Vance, and Frank Porter Graham. After a brief sojourn working for the Tennessee Valley Authority, Ivey became the director of the Southern Regional Education Board, where he advocated for the desegregation of public schools in the South.
Interviewee: John Ivey    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:30:56     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
78.
Virginius Dabney, July 31, 1975. Interview A-0311-2.
Reflections on a Southern Newspaper Editor's Career: Virginius Dabney traces his involvement with the school desegregation crisis in post-1954 Virginia. Dabney's political and social beliefs about integration appeared in the newspaper he edited, the Richmond Times-Dispatch. This interview spans the breadth of his career from the 1920s to the 1970s.
Interviewee: Virginius Dabney    Interviewer: Daniel Jordan, William H. Turpin
Duration: 04:27:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 37 excerpts.
79.
Geraldine Ray, September 13, 1977. Interview R-0128.
Growing Up as an Unofficial Nurse and Farm Girl in Rural North Carolina: Geraldine Ray has lived in Barnardsville, North Carolina, nearly her entire life. In this interview, she describes growing up on her family's farm, attending all-black schools, and caring for sick relatives and friends. She describes racial segregation as a problem that seemed less difficult to avoid than segregation and prejudice between local black residents. Geraldine learned several essential skills of farm life from her grandmother and then used them to support the family through illness. The interview concludes with a description of her husband—a childhood friend—and how they chose to raise their children.
Interviewee: Geraldine Ray    Interviewer: Kelly Navies
Duration: 01:21:53     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
80.
Charles M. Jones, July 21, 1990. Interview A-0335.
A Presbyterian Pastor Loses His Job Because of Racial Activism and Liberal Views on Faith: Charles Jones led the First Presbyterian Church in Chapel Hill as pastor in the late 1940s. He describes his education and ministry in this interview, the controversies during his time at the church, and his eventual expulsion.
Interviewee: Charles M. Jones    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:02:34     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
81.
Guy B. Johnson, December 16, 1974. Interview B-0006.
Leadership of the Southern Regional Council and the North Carolina Committee for Interracial Cooperation, 1924-1945: This interview with Dr. Guy B. Johnson, sociology professor and author, focuses on his work as the first executive director of the Southern Regional Council (SRC) and as a member of the North Carolina Committee for Interracial Cooperation. Johnson discusses the role that women and church groups played in the Interracial Commission, describes the debate over issues such as segregation among SRC members, and outlines the conflict between SRC leaders and the Southern Conference for Human Welfare.
Interviewee: Guy B. Johnson    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 03:09:14     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
82.
Laurie Pritchett, April 23, 1976. Interview B-0027.
Former Police Chief of Albany, Georgia, Reflects on His Role in the Civil Rights Movement: Laurie Pritchett, who served as a police chief in Albany, Georgia, for seven years, describes his role in the civil rights movement in that city. He encouraged a moderate response to large demonstrations in the 1960s, a tactic that prevented the negative publicity brought about by brutal police reaction to marches in other towns in the Deep South.
Interviewee: Laurie Pritchett    Interviewer: James Reston
Duration: 01:00:35     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
83.
Mary Price Adamson, April 19, 1976. Interview G-0001.
Connecting to Beliefs: The Importance of Family, Friends, and Work in the Life of Mary Price Adamson: Beginning with her family background and early childhood, Adamson traces the dynamics that led her to adopt her radical stance later in life. She also responds to the accusations that she had been a Communist spy and explains how the Red Scare affected her life.
Interviewee: Mary Price Adamson    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: Unknown     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 40 excerpts.
84.
David Burgess, August 12, 1983. Interview F-0006.
Laying the Foundation for a Christian Civil Rights Movement: A northerner who followed his passion for justice south, David Burgess spent his life living his religious convictions through a devotion to economic and racial justice. Burgess recalls his involvement with some vanguard rights organizations, such as the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen, a group Burgess believes laid the foundation for a civil rights movement motivated by Christian beliefs.
Interviewee: David Burgess, David Burgess    Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 01:11:26     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
85.
David Burgess, September 25, 1974. Interview E-0001.
Religious Activist Reflects on Southern Labor Union Work: David Burgess discusses how his religious faith fused into his life work of social activism. In particular, he explains his involvement in labor organizing in the South.
Interviewee: David Burgess    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, William Finger
Duration: 01:32:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
86.
Elizabeth and Courtney Siceloff, July 8, 1985. Interview F-0039.
A Quaker Couple's Lifelong Social Activism: Elizabeth and Courtney Siceloff recall their work with the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen and with the Penn School. The interview centers largely on the internal problems and external mission of the Fellowship.
Interviewee: Elizabeth Siceloff, Courtney Siceloff, Elizabeth Siceloff, Courtney Siceloff
Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 01:21:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
87.
Josephine Clement, July 13 and August 3, 1989. Interview C-0074.
Gender and Race in Durham: An African American Woman Recalls Her Career in Politics: Josephine Dobbs Clement talks about her various civic roles, including her activity as a member of the League of Women Voters, the Durham City-County Charter Commission, the Board of Education, and the Board of County Commissioners. She also discusses her efforts on behalf of social justice and her views on race, gender, and environmental issues.
Interviewee: Josephine Clement    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:46:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 16 excerpts.
88.
Nancy Kester Neale, August 6, 1983. Interview F-0036.
Religious Leadership and Economic Justice in the Early Civil Rights Movement: Nancy Kester Neale remembers her father, Howard "Buck" Kester, who founded the Southern Tenant Farmers Union and held leadership positions in the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen and the Committee on Economic and Racial Justice.
Interviewee: Nancy Kester Neale, Nancy Kester Neale    Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 01:10:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
89.
Igal Roodenko, April 11, 1974. Interview B-0010.
Political Pacifist Explains the Founding of CORE and the Journey of Reconciliation: Igal Roodenko came of age during the 1930s and became increasingly involved in leftist politics during those years. During World War II he embraced philosophies of nonviolence and pacifism and worked in a camp for conscientious objectors during the conflict. He became a member of CORE during its formative years and participated in the 1947 Journey of Reconciliation, an interracial endeavor to test segregation policies on buses in the South.
Interviewee: Igal Roodenko    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, Jerry Wingate
Duration: 02:13:59     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
90.
Harvey B. Gantt, January 6, 1986. Interview C-0008.
Seizing the Success of the Civil Rights Movement: Architect and politician Harvey Gantt describes his ascent from a childhood in segregated Charleston, South Carolina, to becoming the first black mayor of Charlotte, North Carolina. As a southerner, he sees the accomplishments of the civil rights movement as dramatic; as a member of the black middle class, he leans toward negotiation rather than revolt.
Interviewee: Harvey B. Gantt    Interviewer: Lynn Haessly
Duration: 01:14:43     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
91.
Marion Wright, March 8, 1978. Interview B-0034.
A Measured Push for Justice in the Pre-Brown South: Marion Wright was one of a group of white southerners who sought to tackle the entrenched racism of the twentieth-century South. As a member of the Southern Regional Council (SRC), he sought to do so without direct action. This interview is a portrait of a civil rights leader in the era before the movement was defined by public protest.
Interviewee: Marion Wright    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:43:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
92.
Broadus Mitchell, August 14 and 15, 1977. Interview B-0024.
An Economic Historian From the South Describes His Participation in Leftist Politics During the First Half of the Twentieth Century: John Broadus Mitchell grew up in a family that held to liberal politics and believed in community involvement. Educated as an economic historian, Mitchell conducted extensive research on the establishment of the cotton textile industry in the South following the Civil War. In the 1920s and 1930s, he advocated for labor rights, spoke out against racial violence, and socialist politics.
Interviewee: Broadus Mitchell    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: 03:53:51     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
93.
William Patrick Murphy, January 17, 1978. Interview B-0043.
A University Professor Defends Brown v. Board of Education in 1950s Mississippi: Lawyer William Patrick Murphy describes his 1950s battle against segregation and his struggle to keep his job after his beliefs became public in Oxford, Mississippi. Murphy, who taught constitutional law at the University of Mississippi, used journal articles and his classroom to speak out in favor of the Brown decision.
Interviewee: William Patrick Murphy    Interviewer: Sean Devereux
Duration: 01:01:48     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
94.
Ernest Seeman, February 13, 1976. Interview B-0012.
Southern Printer and Writer Describes Life in Durham, North Carolina, During the Rise of the Tobacco Industry: Ernest Seeman offers a critical assessment of life in Durham, North Carolina, during the late nineteenth century. Seeman spent his early career as a printer, first as his father's apprentice and later as sole proprietor of the Seeman Printery, and he discusses interactions between his family and the Duke family. In addition, Seeman explains his increasing radicalization as head of the Duke Press from 1925 to 1934, and briefly discusses his decision to become a writer in later years.
Interviewee: Ernest Seeman    Interviewer: Mimi Conway
Duration: 02:44:21     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
95.
Ruth Vick, 1973. Interview B-0057.
A Look Inside the Southern Regional Council: Ruth Vick describes her tenure at the Southern Regional Council (SRC), an interracial organization committed to racial justice in the South. The SRC supported the direct action strategies of the civil rights movement that emerged in force in the 1950s and 1960s, but chose study over sit-ins as a means of change. This interview addresses this decision as well as decades of internal disputes.
Interviewee: Ruth Vick    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, Bob Hall
Duration: 06:33:47     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
96.
William W. Finlator, April 19, 1985. Interview C-0007.
A Christian Passion for Justice: Reverend William W. Finlator speaks about his Christian devotion to racial and economic justice and his fear that the modern-day mingling of religion and politics is polluting both.
Interviewee: William W. Finlator    Interviewer: Jay Jenkins
Duration: 01:28:28     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
97.
Vivion Lenon Brewer, October 15, 1976. Interview G-0012.
Women's Emergency Committee Activist's Role in the Little Rock Crisis: In this interview, Vivion Lenon Brewer explains how her awareness of racial disparities caused her to support school desegregation in Little Rock, Arkansas. She discusses her leadership in pushing politicians to reopen the closed public schools during the 1958-1959 Little Rock school crisis.
Interviewee: Vivion Lenon Brewer    Interviewer: Elizabeth Jacoway
Duration: 01:32:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
98.
Louise Young, February 14, 1972. Interview G-0066.
A White Teacher Describes Her Work at Historically Black Colleges: Louise Young was an educated woman from Tennessee who spent most of her adult life working to promote better race relations in the South. Young describes her years teaching at African American institutions of higher education—Paine College and the Hampton Institute—during the 1910s and 1920s; her job as the director of the Department of Home Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, where she trained students at Scarritt College in race relations; her support of women's organizations, particularly the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching; and labor activism, as exemplified by the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee.
Interviewee: Louise Young    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 03:09:02     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
99.
Herman Talmadge, July 15 and 24, 1975. Interview A-0331-1.
Senator Herman Talmadge Recalls His Early Involvement in Georgia Politics, His Father's Political Legacy, and His Rise to Prominence: In this interview, the first in a three-part series, Herman Talmadge discusses his political career as governor of Georgia and his decision to run for the United States Senate.
Interviewee: Herman Talmadge    Interviewer: Jack Nelson
Duration: 01:48:53     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
100.
Herman Talmadge, July 29 and August 1, 1975. Interview A-0331-2.
Georgia Senator Herman Talmadge Offers His Perspective on National Politics During His Years in the Senate: Senator Herman Talmadge of Georgia recalls national political happenings during his tenure in the Senate from the mid-1950s through the mid-1970s.
Interviewee: Herman Talmadge    Interviewer: Jack Nelson
Duration: 01:37:30     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
101.
Herman Talmadge, December 18, 1975. Interview A-0331-3.
Georgia Senator Herman Talmadge Reflects on Political and Social Issues in the 1970s and His Political Legacy: Senator Herman Talmadge of Georgia offers concluding remarks in this final interview of a three-part series, reflecting on contemporary political issues of the mid-1970s. Additionally, he reflects on his own political legacy in the state of Georgia.
Interviewee: Herman Talmadge    Interviewer: Jack Nelson
Duration: 00:38:19     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
102.
Howard Kester, July 22, 1974. Interview B-0007-1.
Southern Social Justice Activist Describes Views on Race, Labor, and Religion: Howard Kester was a pacifist and social reformer in the South from the early 1920s through the 1960s. In this interview, he focuses on his adherence to pacifism, Christianity, the Social Gospel, and Socialism. He describes his work to end injustices associated with race and labor, and assesses the work of prominent social justice leaders in the South during the 1920s and 1930s.
Interviewee: Howard Kester    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, William Finger
Duration: 02:58:02     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
103.
J. Randolph Taylor, May 23, 1985. Interview C-0021.
The Good Fights: J. Randolph Taylor on Social Justice, Civil Rights, and Presbyterian Reunification: J. Randolph Taylor pauses to reflect on his participation in the civil rights movement, the reunification of the Presbyterian Church of the United States of America, and various other social justice campaigns.
Interviewee: J. Randolph Taylor    Interviewer: Bruce Kalk
Duration: 01:39:23     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
104.
William Dallas Herring, February 14, 1987. Interview C-0034.
Shaping a Mission for North Carolina's Public Schools: William Dallas Herring discusses his rise to membership and tenure on the North Carolina State Board of Education and the struggle to create a community college system.
Interviewee: William Dallas Herring    Interviewer: Jay Jenkins
Duration: 02:55:51     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
105.
William Dallas Herring, May 16, 1987. Interview C-0035.
Democratizing Education in North Carolina: William Dallas Herring, longtime chair of the North Carolina State Board of Education, discusses the ins and outs of education in his state.
Interviewee: William Dallas Herring    Interviewer: Jay Jenkins
Duration: 02:20:39     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
106.
Howard Kester, August 25, 1974. Interview B-0007-2.
Southern Socialist and Christian Activist Discusses Civil Rights and Labor Activism During the 1930s and 1940s: Socialist and Christian activist Howard Kester describes his work in various organizations committed to social justice in the South during the 1930s and 1940s. In particular, Kester focuses on his work in promoting equality for African Americans and working people in the South, including his efforts to bridge gaps between those two groups.
Interviewee: Howard Kester    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: 01:35:38     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
107.
Guion Griffis Johnson, July 1, 1974. Interview G-0029-4.
Southern Sociologist Discusses Her Roles in Issues of Social Justice: Southern sociologist Guion Griffis Johnson describes her work with the Georgia Conference on Social Welfare during the 1940s and her involvement with the women's movement and civil rights activism during the 1960s and 1970s in North Carolina. She discusses strategies for effecting change, the achievements of the Georgia Conference in promoting awareness of social welfare and race-related issues, and the progress of women and African Americans in their struggle for equality.
Interviewee: Guion Griffis Johnson    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: 02:38:58     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
108.
Kojo Nantambu, May 15, 1978. Interview B-0059.
"Them Old Gun-Toting Militants"?: Kojo Nantambu Reflects on the 1971 Race Conflicts in Wilmington, North Carolina, and the Wilmington Ten: In this May 1978 interview, Kojo Nantambu—one of the participants in the 1971 Wilmington, North Carolina, race conflicts—describes what he remembers of the 1971 strife, the inequities present in the trial of the Wilmington Ten, and the aftermath of the discord.
Interviewee: Kojo Nantambu    Interviewer: Larry Thomas
Duration: 01:02:59     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 18 excerpts.
109.
Patricia Neal, June 6, 1989. Interview C-0068.
School Board Member Describes Process of Integration in Durham Schools: Patricia Neal settled in Durham, North Carolina, during the 1950s and became an active member of the community. Having served on the Durham County Board of Education from the late 1960s through the 1980s, Neal describes the process of integration and its impact on Durham schools and on the community.
Interviewee: Patricia Neal    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:26:42     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
110.
Phyllis Tyler, October 10, 1988. Interview C-0080.
Southern White Woman Describes Her Involvement in the Civil Rights Movement and Race Relations in Raleigh, North Carolina: Phyllis Tyler first moved to North Carolina during the 1940s in order to join the Blessed Community of Quakers in Celo. In the 1950s, she moved with her family to Raleigh, where she became increasingly involved in the civil rights movement. Throughout the interview, she emphasizes the changing nature of race relations from the 1950s into the 1980s.
Interviewee: Phyllis Tyler    Interviewer: Terri Myers
Duration: 00:47:03     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
111.
Willie Mae Lee Crews, June 16, 2005. Interview U-0020.
African American Teacher Describes the Process of Desegregation and its Implications for Students in Birmingham, Alabama: Willie Mae Crews, the daughter of a sharecropper, was a teacher at Hayes High School, an African American school in Birmingham, Alabama, during the 1960s and 1970s. Crews describes Hayes as an excellent segregated school that did not benefit from the desegregation that began during the 1970-1971 school year.
Interviewee: Willie Mae Lee Crews    Interviewer: Kimberly Hill
Duration: 02:21:29     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
112.
William and Josephine Clement, June 19, 1986. Interview C-0031.
Husband and Wife Discuss Race Relations in Atlanta and Durham: William and Josephine Clement were both born and raised in the South. They describe their family backgrounds and education. Josephine focuses on race relations in Atlanta and her father's radical politics, while William describes his participation with the Masons and his work with North Carolina Mutual.
Interviewee: William Clement, Josephine Clement    Interviewer: Walter Weare, Juanita Weare
Duration: 03:10:11     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
113.
Edward L. Rankin, August 20, 1987. Interview C-0044.
Assistant to Governors Umstead and Hodges Describes North Carolina Politics and the Pearsall Plan: Edward L. Rankin served as private secretary to North Carolina Governors William Umstead (1952-1954) and Luther Hodges (1954-1961). In this interview he describes their political leadership, the Pearsall Plan, and the spectrum of political responses to the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Interviewee: Edward L. Rankin    Interviewer: Jay Jenkins
Duration: 01:34:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
114.
Henry Ell Frye, February 18 and 26, 1992. Interview C-0091.
North Carolina Lawyer and Supreme Court Justice Discusses Race Relations and His Career: Henry Frye grew up in a segregated farming community in North Carolina during the 1930s and 1940s before becoming a lawyer. He went on to become the first African American elected to the North Carolina General Assembly and to serve on the state supreme court. In this interview, he describes race relations, his career as a lawyer, and his experiences in politics.
Interviewee: Henry Ell Frye    Interviewer: Amy E. Boening
Duration: 02:44:14     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
115.
Alexander M. Rivera, November 30, 2001. Interview C-0297.
African American Photojournalist Describes His Coverage of the Civil Rights Movement (Part I): African American photojournalist Alexander M. Rivera describes the civil rights movement from his perspective as a reporter for the Pittsburgh Courier. He focuses on the nature of race relations and racial violence and describes the impact of the Brown v. Board of Education decision on the changing social landscape.
Interviewee: Alexander M. Rivera    Interviewer: Kieran Taylor
Duration: 01:58:12     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
116.
Alexander M. Rivera, February 1, 2002. Interview C-0298.
African American Photojournalist Describes His Coverage of the Civil Rights Movement (Part II): African American photojournalist Alexander M. Rivera describes the civil rights movement and its aftermath. In particular, he describes some of his photographs, as well as the impact of the Brown decision (and the demise of legal segregation) on African American businesses and African American schools, including North Carolina Central College.
Interviewee: Alexander M. Rivera    Interviewer: Kieran Taylor
Duration: 00:47:46     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
117.
Stanford Raynold Brookshire, August 18, 1975. Interview B-0067.
Local Politician's Critique of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County's Consolidation: Stanford Raynold Brookshire, Charlotte's first four-term mayor, explains why Charlotte and Mecklenburg County failed to consolidate their city services in the early 1970s.
Interviewee: Stanford Raynold Brookshire    Interviewer: Bill Moye
Duration: 00:37:26     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
118.
Clyde Cook, July 10, 1977. Interview H-0003.
African American Worker Describes Social and Economic Inequalities: Clyde Cook describes life and work for African Americans in Badin, North Carolina. Discussing such topics as school segregation, racial hierarchies in the workplace, and the lack of job opportunities, Cook offers insight into social and economic inequalities in a southern working community.
Interviewee: Clyde Cook    Interviewer: Rosemarie Hester
Duration: 00:58:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
119.
Virginia Grantham, March 6, 1985. Interview F-0017.
Southern Woman Offers Her Thoughts on the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen: Virginia Grantham discusses her thoughts on the Fellowship of Southern Churchman and her participation in it, primarily during the 1950s. In the interview, she focuses on such topics as leadership, socialism, and connections to the civil rights movement.
Interviewee: Virginia Grantham, Virginia Grantham    Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 00:24:16     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
120.
Jean Fairfax, October 15, 1983. Interview F-0013.
African American Civil Rights Activist Describes Her Work with the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen During the 1940s: Jean Fairfax first moved to the South in 1942, where she became involved with the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen for several years. Fairfax describes the goals and activities of the Fellowship, discusses the role of leadership in the Fellowship, and draws connections between her work with the Fellowship in the 1940s and her later involvement with the civil rights movement from the late 1950s on.
Interviewee: Jean Fairfax, Jean Fairfax    Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 00:52:09     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
121.
Ashley Davis, April 12, 1974. Interview E-0062.
Member of the Black Student Movement Describes the Food Workers Strike at the University of North Carolina: Ashley Davis was a member of the Black Student Movement (BSM) at the University of North Carolina during the late 1960s and early 1970s. In this interview, he describes how the BSM supported the striking food workers at UNC in 1969.
Interviewee: Ashley Davis    Interviewer: Russell Rymer
Duration: 01:36:10     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
122.
Jim Pierce, July 16, 1974. Interview E-0012-3.
Southern Labor Organizer Describes his View of the Movement During the Mid-Twentieth Century: Jim Pierce first learned about the labor movement while growing up in Oklahoma during the 1930s. By the late 1940s, he had become a leader in his local union at Western Electric in Fort Worth, Texas. During the 1950s and 1960s, he organized unions for the CIO, the IUE, and the IUD. He describes his belief in labor activism but also his growing disillusionment with the movement by the end of the 1960s.
Interviewee: Jim Pierce    Interviewer: William Finger
Duration: 02:04:47     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
123.
Grace Towns Hamilton, July 19, 1974. Interview G-0026.
African American Civil Rights Activist Describes Her Work with the YWCA and the Urban League: Grace Towns Hamilton was raised in Atlanta, where both of her parents were involved in community service and issues of social justice. Following family tradition, Hamilton was an active participant in the YWCA during the 1920s, and during the 1940s and 1950s she was the director for Atlanta's Urban League. She describes her work with these organizations, focusing on issues of segregation, education, voter registration, and housing.
Interviewee: Grace Towns Hamilton    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:34:37     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
124.
Emily S. MacLachlan, July 16, 1974. Interview G-0038.
Southern Sociologist Discusses Education, Career, and Her Mother's Life: Emily S. MacLachlan grew up in the early twentieth century in Jackson, Mississippi, in a family that advocated relatively progressive ideas about race. MacLachlan describes her mother's efforts to balance family life with social activism (specifically with the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching), her own academic endeavors, and her advocacy of civil rights and radical politics during the 1930s.
Interviewee: Emily S. MacLachlan    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:34:59     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
125.
Harvey E. Beech, September 25, 1996. Interview J-0075.
A Black Educational Pioneer's Quest for Legal Justice: Harvey E. Beech describes his journey to becoming a lawyer fighting for legal justice. In 1951, he was one of five students who made up the first group of African Americans to attend the University of North Carolina School of Law. Beech assesses the racial changes since the mid-twentieth century and discusses racism in contemporary America.
Interviewee: Harvey E. Beech    Interviewer: Anita Foye
Duration: 01:33:50     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
126.
Jonathan Worth Daniels, March 9-11, 1977. Interview A-0313.
Newspaper Editor's Colorful Memories of North Carolina's Race and Politics: In this interview, Jonathan Daniels discusses his father's role as a newspaper editor and Secretary of the Navy, as well as his father's racial and religious views. Daniels also describes how race and the University of North Carolina shaped his own life.
Interviewee: Jonathan Worth Daniels    Interviewer: Charles Eagles
Duration: 09:52:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 18 excerpts.
127.
Elizabeth Pearsall, May 25, 1988. Interview C-0056.
Wife Recalls Husband's Role in North Carolina's School Desegregation Plan: Elizabeth Pearsall reflects on the role of her husband, Thomas Pearsall, in the North Carolina school desegregation plan. She also discusses her own efforts at fostering racial cooperation.
Interviewee: Elizabeth Pearsall    Interviewer: Walter E. Campbell
Duration: 01:15:39     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
128.
Annie Mack Barbee, May 28, 1979. Interview H-0190.
Standing Up: Annie Mack Barbee Reflects on Race and Gender in Durham's Tobacco Industry: Annie Mack Barbee describes her life as a worker in the segregated Liggett & Myers tobacco factories, and discusses how gender, class and race affected her life and the choices she made.
Interviewee: Annie Mack Barbee    Interviewer: Beverly Jones
Duration: 02:08:38     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
129.
Anne Queen, April 30, 1976. Interview G-0049-1.
From Factory Floor to Yale: A Life Dedicated to Social Justice: Anne Queen spent ten years working for the Champion Paper and Fibre Company in North Carolina before continuing her education at Berea College and Yale Divinity School during the 1940s. In this interview, she describes her life as a worker, her advocacy of social justice causes, her experiences in higher education, and her work at University of Georgia, with the Friends Service Committee, and the YWCA-YMCA at University of North Carolina.
Interviewee: Anne Queen    Interviewer: Joseph A. Herzenberg
Duration: 02:37:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
130.
John Jessup, January 11, 1991. Interview M-0024.
Black Principal and Administrator Reflects on Career in Education: John Jessup discusses his employment as the principal of a North Carolina public school and as an administrator in the Winston-Salem public schools. He describes the challenges he faced as an African American as well as the changes brought about by desegregation.
Interviewee: John Jessup    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 01:18:48     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
131.
Willie Snow Ethridge, December 15, 1975. Interview G-0024.
A Southern Woman Describes Her Writing Career, Family Life, and the Anti-Lynching Movement: Willie Snow Ethridge discusses her career as a writer in the South and her efforts to combine work with family and marriage. In addition, she describes growing up in Georgia, gender expectations in the South, and her work in the anti-lynching movement.
Interviewee: Willie Snow Ethridge    Interviewer: Lee Kessler
Duration: 01:35:15     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
132.
Evelyn Schmidt, February 9, 1999. Interview K-0137.
Class, Communication, and Community Health in Durham, North Carolina: Dr. Evelyn Schmidt discusses the connections between race, class, nationality, and health in Durham, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Evelyn Schmidt    Interviewer: Ann Kaplan
Duration: 00:59:34     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
133.
Bennie Higgins, December 28, 1990. Interview M-0003.
A Principal's Perspective on Race in the Classroom in Desegregated Greensboro, North Carolina: Longtime North Carolina high school principal Bennie Higgins describes the details of the position and reflects on race in the post-desegregation classroom.
Interviewee: Bennie Higgins    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 00:50:54     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
134.
Venton Bell, January 30, 1991. Interview M-0018.
A Black Principal Considers Desegregation's Legacy in Charlotte, North Carolina: Venton Bell, principal of Harding High School in Charlotte, North Carolina, describes his duties and reflects on race and education.
Interviewee: Venton Bell    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 00:49:57     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
135.
Modjeska Simkins, November 15, 1974. Interview G-0056-1.
Social Justice Activist from South Carolina Describes Her Childhood, Her Work with the Interracial Commission, and Race Relations: Modjeska Simkins describes growing up in a prosperous African American family, going to school, and her thoughts on "color consciousness" during her childhood in Columbia, South Carolina. In addition, she discusses her involvement in the South Carolina Commission on Interracial Cooperation and other race organizations beginning in the 1920s, her thoughts on women's unique capabilities as leaders of social justice movements, and the nature of racial tension in the South.
Interviewee: Modjeska Simkins    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:34:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
136.
Robert Logan, December 28, 1990. Interview M-0027.
The End of Desegregation: Discrimination Returns to Schools in the 1980s: Robert Logan, principal of Hugh M. Cummings High School in Burlington, North Carolina, reflects on the details of his job and the challenge of race in the post-desegregation atmosphere.
Interviewee: Robert Logan    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 01:40:27     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
137.
Leroy Campbell, January 4, 1991. Interview M-0007.
The End of Black Education: A Black Principal Remembers Desegregation in Iredell County, North Carolina: Leroy Campbell describes his experiences as the principal of the all-black Unity School in Iredell County, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Leroy Campbell    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 01:10:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
138.
Loistine Defreece, February 16, 1991. Interview M-0034.
A Pioneering Black Female Principal Describes a Challenging, Rewarding Job: Loistine Defreece, the first black female principal in Lumberton, North Carolina, discusses her job and reflects briefly on some of the challenges race poses to modern educators.
Interviewee: Loistine Defreece    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 01:04:25     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 2 excerpts.
139.
Robert Winston, January 26, 1991. Interview M-0030.
A Black Principal Shares His Thoughts on Race and Education: Robert Winston, principal of Wake Forest-Rolesville High School, describes his duties in this interview, reflecting briefly on the impact of desegregation.
Interviewee: Robert Winston    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells, Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 00:43:11     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 2 excerpts.
140.
Johnny A. Freeman, December 27, 1990. Interview M-0011.
A Long-Serving Principal Reflects on Desegregation: Longtime principal Johnny A. Freeman reflects on the mixed legacy of desegregation.
Interviewee: Johnny A. Freeman    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 01:25:34     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
141.
Modjeska Simkins, July 28, 1976. Interview G-0056-2.
African American Activist Describes Her Work with the NAACP and the Richland County Citizens Committee in South Carolina: African American civil rights activist Modjeska Simkins describes her upbringing in a prosperous family during the early twentieth century. She charts her work with the Tuberculosis Association, the NAACP, and the Richland County Citizens' Committee. Throughout the interview, Simkins offers telling anecdotes about racial tensions in South Carolina, the inner workings of civil rights organizations, and relationships between leaders of the movement.
Interviewee: Modjeska Simkins    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 05:45:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
142.
Richard Hicks, February 1, 1991. Interview M-0023.
A Black Principal and an All-Black High School in Post-Desegregation North Carolina: Richard Hicks, who in 1991 was the principal of the all-black Hillside High School in Durham, North Carolina, describes his job and offers some brief thoughts on the minimal impact of desegregation on his career in education.
Interviewee: Richard Hicks    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 00:45:50     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
143.
Charles Johnson, December 29, 1990. Interview M-0025.
Projecting Authority: A Black Principal Asserts Control Decades after Desegregation: Black principal Charles Johnson describes the challenges of his profession and his extra effort to maintain discipline in a post-desegregation environment.
Interviewee: Charles Johnson    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells, Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 01:27:56     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
144.
Coleman Barbour, February 16, 1991. Interview M-0032.
The Legacy of Racism: Underachieving Black Students: Coleman Barbour reflects on the diminished power of black principals as well as the state of the black community and its waning investment in education.
Interviewee: Coleman Barbour    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 01:35:03     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
145.
Ray Spain, January 26, 1990. Interview M-0029.
A Black Principal in Post-Desegregation North Carolina: Ray Spain, the principal of Bertie High School, describes his management style and the demands of his job.
Interviewee: Ray Spain    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 00:56:37     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 1 excerpts.
146.
J. W. Mask, February 15, 1991. Interview M-0013.
Adapting to Segregation: A Black Principal Provides for His Segregated School: J. W. Mask describes his stewardship of a segregated black high school and his struggle to provide his students with adequate resources.
Interviewee: J. W. Mask    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 01:41:30     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
147.
Edith Mitchell Dabbs, October 4, 1975. Interview G-0022.
A Southern Woman Advocates Social and Racial Justice in South Carolina in the Mid-Twentieth Century: South Carolinian Edith Mitchell Dabbs discusses her family history as well that of her husband's family, which owned the Rip Raps Plantation. In addition, she describes the work she and her husband, James McBride Dabbs, did in advocating for racial justice during the 1940s and 1950s, their evolving views about race and race relations, and her involvement with the United Church Women.
Interviewee: Edith Mitchell Dabbs    Interviewer: Elizabeth Jacoway Burns
Duration: 04:12:26     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
148.
Charles Adams, February 18, 2000. Interview K-0646.
A North Carolina Educator Describes the Process of School Desegregation in Wake County: Charles Adams was a teacher and coach in Wake County, North Carolina, during the 1960s before becoming the assistant director (and later the director) of the North Carolina High School Athletics Association. In addition, Adams's father was a leader in the effort to desegregate Wake County schools. Consequently, Adams offers an insider's perspective on the process of school desegregation, focusing specifically on Cary, North Carolina, as a pioneer and model for other local schools.
Interviewee: Charles Adams    Interviewer: Peggy Van Scoyoc
Duration: 01:02:38     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
149.
Terry Graham, March 22, 1999. Interview K-0434.
Race and Change in Mooresville, North Carolina: Terry Graham, resident of Mooresville, North Carolina, and taxi service operator, describes his changing town and its relationship to Charlotte. He also discusses the desegregation of the local schools.
Interviewee: Terry Graham    Interviewer: Amanda Covington
Duration: 00:37:51     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
150.
Carl A. Mills Jr., June 30, 1999. Interview K-0182.
Easy Desegregation in Cary, North Carolina: Carl A. Mills Jr., principal of Cary High School during its desegregation, recalls a relatively easy process of integration.
Interviewee: Carl A. Mills    Interviewer: Peggy Van Scoyoc
Duration: 01:29:35     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
151.
Steve Cherry, February 19, 1999. Interview K-0430.
Desegregation On and Off the Basketball Court: Steve Cherry describes desegregation from the perspective of a coach and a principal in Lincoln County, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Steve Cherry    Interviewer: Mark Jones
Duration: 00:58:32     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
152.
Kong Phok, December 19, 2000. Interview K-0273.
A Cambodian-American in a Greensboro Mill: Cambodian-American Kong Phok describes his experiences at Guilford Mills in Greensboro, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Kong Phok    Interviewer: Barbara Lau
Duration: 01:18:10     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
153.
Leroy Magness, March 27, 1999. Interview K-0438.
Avoiding Conflict during Desegregation: Leroy Magness describes his belief in avoiding conflict, and how that belief shaped his response to the civil rights movement.
Interviewee: Leroy Magness    Interviewer: Michelle Markey
Duration: 01:21:45     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
154.
Vennie Moore, February 24, 1999. Interview K-0439.
A Childhood in Segregated Davidson, North Carolina: Vennie Moore recalls her childhood in segregated Davidson, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Vennie Moore    Interviewer: Brian Campbell, Laura Hajar
Duration: 01:18:26     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
155.
Gwendolyn Matthews, December 9, 1999. Interview K-0654.
African American Woman Describes Her Experiences as One of the First Students to Integrate Cary High School: In 1962, Gwendolyn Matthews was one of five African American students to integrate Cary High School in North Carolina. In this interview, she describes her experiences in the integration process, emphasizing the hostility of white students and teachers. In addition, she speaks more broadly about segregation and integration in Cary and Raleigh.
Interviewee: Gwendolyn Matthews    Interviewer: Peggy Van Scoyoc
Duration: 01:10:02     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
156.
Leslie Thorbs, May 30, 2001. Interview K-0589.
A North Carolinian Describes Tenant Farming, Family Life, and the Devastation of Hurricane Floyd: Leslie Thorbs describes growing up in a tenant farming family in eastern North Carolina, during the 1920s and 1930s. Thorbs describes his experiences with poverty, farming, factory work, race relations, and family life. He concludes the interview by discussing the devastating impact of Hurricane Floyd's flooding on his family and his community.
Interviewee: Leslie Thorbs    Interviewer: Leda Hartman
Duration: 01:04:04     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
157.
Oscar Dearmont Baker, June 1977. Interview H-0110.
Reflections on Work and Community Changes in Conover, North Carolina: Oscar Dearmont Baker spent his childhood and most of his adult life in Conover, North Carolina. In this interview, he describes his experiences working in the furniture and hosiery industries, paying particular attention to his time spent at Conover Furniture. He also describes broader changes within the city of Conover.
Interviewee: Oscar Dearmont Baker    Interviewer: Patty Dilley
Duration: 02:04:22     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
158.
Nelle Morton, June 29, 1983. Interview F-0034.
A Woman Leads the Churchmen: An Interview with the Former General Secretary of the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen: Nelle Morton served as the general secretary of the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen from 1944 to 1950. In this interview, she describes her perception of the leaders of the Fellowship and the organization's aims and strategies in advocating for various social justice causes, including racial integration and labor rights. In addition, she describes her leadership of a male-dominated organization and how her work with the Fellowship raised her awareness of the need for women's liberation as well.
Interviewee: Nelle Morton    Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 03:41:16     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
159.
Brenda Tapia, February 2, 2001. Interview K-0476.
Desegregation as Disaster: Brenda Tapia, one of the first African Americans to attend North Mecklenburg High School in Huntersville, North Carolina, describes an alternative view of desegregation.
Interviewee: Brenda Tapia    Interviewer: Jonetta Johnson
Duration: 00:43:14     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
160.
Maggie W. Ray, November 9, 2000. Interview K-0825.
The Legacy of Desegregation at West Charlotte High School: Maggie Ray, teacher at West Charlotte High School in Charlotte, North Carolina, reflects on the legacies of desegregation.
Interviewee: Maggie W. Ray    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:09:25     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
161.
Ian Thomas Palmquist, June 27, 2001. Interview K-0848.
A North Carolinian Discusses His Promotion of Tolerance for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Sexualities During the 1990s: Ian Thomas Palmquist describes his work in advocating for awareness and tolerance for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender sexualities. Palmquist "came out" to his friends and family while a high school student in Raleigh, North Carolina during the early 1990s when he became involved in his first protest. In addition, Palmquist explains his work with B-GLAD and QNC at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his work with Equality NC PAC following his graduation.
Interviewee: Ian Thomas Palmquist    Interviewer: Chris McGinnis
Duration: 01:23:56     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
162.
Ruth Dial Woods, June 12, 1992. Interview L-0078.
Lumbee Woman Describes Her Work in the Civil Rights and Women's Liberation Movements and Her Role on the University of North Carolina Board of Governors: Ruth Dial Woods describes growing up as a Lumbee Indian in Robeson County, North Carolina, in the 1930s and 1940s. During the 1960s, Woods participated in the civil rights and women's liberation movements. In 1985, she was appointed to the University of North Carolina Board of Governors, where she worked to promote equality for minority students.
Interviewee: Ruth Dial Woods    Interviewer: Anne Mitchell Coe, Laura Moore
Duration: 01:44:23     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
163.
Cecil W. Wooten, July 16, 2001. Interview K-0849.
University of North Carolina Professor Talks Discusses His Role in the Gay Rights Movement: Cecil W. Wooten, professor of Classics at the University of North Carolina, grew up in Kinston, North Carolina, in the 1940s and 1950s. He became aware at an early age that he was gay but was not exposed to an openly gay community until he became a graduate student at University of North Carolina during the late 1960s and early 1970s. He did not actively participate in that community until he returned to UNC as a professor in 1980. He describes his work in the gay rights movement at UNC and describes Chapel Hill as a relatively tolerant community.
Interviewee: Cecil W. Wooten    Interviewer: Chris McGinnis
Duration: 01:29:03     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
164.
Raymond Dawson, February 4, 1991. Interview L-0133.
Former Vice President of Academic Affairs Discusses Desegregation of North Carolina Colleges and Universities: Former Vice President of Academic Affairs at the University of North Carolina, Raymond Dawson, discusses tensions surrounding federal desegregation orders in North Carolina during the 1970s. Because of North Carolina's comparatively large number of historically black colleges, the state became a testing ground for the federal government to explore ways to integrate public education while preserving historically black colleges.
Interviewee: Raymond Dawson    Interviewer: William Link
Duration: 00:46:25     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 2 excerpts.
165.
Katushka Olave, December 9, 1998. Interview K-0659.
Working for Racial Equality in Durham, North Carolina: Katushka Olave describes her activism on behalf of the Latino community in Durham, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Katushka Olave    Interviewer: Alicia Rouverol
Duration: 01:01:36     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
166.
Raleigh Bailey, December 6, 2000. Interview K-0270.
Advocating for Immigrants in Greensboro, North Carolina: Raleigh Bailey describes his work with Southeast Asian immigrant groups in Greensboro, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Raleigh Bailey    Interviewer: Barbara Lau
Duration: 01:16:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 2 excerpts.
167.
Kenneth Norton, March 23, 1999. Interview K-0440.
Remembering Segregated Davidson, North Carolina: Kenneth Norton remembers being a student at the segregated Ada Jenkins School in Davidson, North Carolina, in the 1930s.
Interviewee: Kenneth Norton    Interviewer: Brian Campbell
Duration: 00:36:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
168.
Leroy Beavers, August 8, 2002. Interview R-0170.
"Integration Was a Terrible Thing": The Decline of the Black Community in Savannah, Georgia: Leroy Beavers despairs of the effects of integration on Savannah, Georgia.
Interviewee: Leroy Beavers    Interviewer: Kieran Taylor
Duration: 00:45:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
169.
George Simkins, April 6, 1997. Interview R-0018.
Desegregating Health: Fighting the Segregation of Hospitals in Greensboro, North Carolina: Dentist George Simkins describes his efforts to desegregate hospitals and other facilities in Greensboro, North Carolina.
Interviewee: George Simkins    Interviewer: Karen Kruse Thomas
Duration: 01:11:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
170.
William C. Friday, November 19, 1990. Interview L-0144.
Former University of North Carolina President William Friday Discusses the Relationship Between State and University Politics: Former president of the University of North Carolina System William Friday describes his relationship with and perception of his predecessors Frank Porter Graham and Gordon Gray. In addition, he describes various aspects of his own presidency, including his approach to desegregation and his relationships with a variety of individuals and organizations.
Interviewee: William C. Friday    Interviewer: William Link
Duration: 01:28:43     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
171.
Andrew Best, April 19, 1997. Interview R-0011.
Equal Care: Desegregating Medicine in Pitt County, North Carolina: Physician Andrew Best recalls his encounters with racial segregation inside and outside Pitt County Memorial Hospital in in North Carolina during the civil rights era.
Interviewee: Andrew Best    Interviewer: Karen Kruse Thomas
Duration: 02:17:43     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
172.
Clyde Smith, March 17, 1999. Interview K-0443.
Coaching Integration: Race and Sports in Lincolnton, North Carolina: Clyde Smith recalls the tensions that integration introduced to athletics at North Carolina's Lincolnton High School.
Interviewee: Clyde Smith    Interviewer: Reid McGlamery
Duration: 00:38:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
173.
Salter and Doris Cochran, April 12, 1997. Interview R-0014.
Treating Race, Treating Poverty: Segregation, Poverty, Race, and Medical Care in Weldon, North Carolina: Salter and Doris Cochran reflect on the many challenges that faced them in their efforts to desegregate medical care and public education in Weldon, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Salter Cochran, Doris Cochran    Interviewer: Karen Kruse Thomas
Duration: 03:01:22     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
174.
Floyd Alston Jr., November 29, 1995. Interview Q-0002.
One Family's Life in Granville County, North Carolina: Granville County, North Carolina, resident Floyd Alston and his mother, Ethel Thorpe Alston, remember their lives in the area in an interview that touches on, among other topics, racial identity and the struggles of post-emancipation African Americans to find economic and social security.
Interviewee: Floyd Alston    Interviewer: Eddie McCoy
Duration: 00:58:50     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 2 excerpts.
175.
David Breneman, May 10, 1991. Interview L-0122.
HEW Official Discusses Federal Criteria for Desegregation of Southern Universities and Colleges: Economist David Breneman discusses his brief tenure with the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) in 1977. In this interview, Breneman describes his role in the establishment of federal criteria for school desegregation, focusing particularly on HEW's interactions with education officials in North Carolina.
Interviewee: David Breneman    Interviewer: William Link
Duration: 00:53:58     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
176.
Floyd Adams, August 16, 2002. Interview R-0168.
The Challenge of Progress: Urban Renewal and the Black Community in Savannah, Georgia: Two-time mayor and newspaper publisher Floyd Adams Jr. describes urban renewal past and present in Savannah, Georgia, and its impact on the black community.
Interviewee: Floyd Adams    Interviewer: Kieran Taylor
Duration: 01:03:11     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
177.
James Slade, February 23, 1997. Interview R-0019.
Race, Poverty, and Health: The Desegregation of Medicine and the Legacies of Segregation in Rural North Carolina: Pediatrician James Slade and his wife, Catherine, discuss their experience of race and medicine in Edenton, North Carolina.
Interviewee: James Slade    Interviewer: Karen Kruse Thomas
Duration: 02:58:19     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
178.
Martin Gerry, August 28, 1991. Interview L-0157.
Desegregation and Disappointment in North Carolina's University System: Martin Gerry recalls his efforts, as the director of the Office of Civil Rights, to accelerate desegregation in North Carolina.
Interviewee: Martin Gerry    Interviewer: William Link
Duration: 01:02:42     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
179.
Dorothy Royster Burwell, May 29, 1996. Interview Q-0011.
The Water Comes to Soudan, Virginia: A Government Dam Washes Away a Small Community: Dorothy Royster Burwell describes her family history and remembers the devastating effect of "the water," in the form of a government-built lake, that wiped away her community of Soudan, Virginia.
Interviewee: Dorothy Royster Burwell    Interviewer: Eddie McCoy
Duration: 00:46:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
180.
Peter Holmes, April 18, 1991. Interview L-0168.
Former Director of the Office for Civil Rights Discusses Desegregation Policies for Higher Education During the 1970s: Peter Holmes served as the Director of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) from 1973 to 1975. In this interview, he discusses the challenges the OCR faced in developing and enforcing guidelines for the desegregation of higher education in southern states.
Interviewee: Peter Holmes    Interviewer: William Link
Duration: 01:08:23     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
181.
John Lewis, November 20, 1973. Interview A-0073.
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Leader Describes His Role in the Civil Rights Movement: John Lewis served as the chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) from 1963 to 1966. In this interview, Lewis outlines his role within the civil rights movement through his participation in the sit-in movement of 1960 in Nashville, the Freedom Rides through Alabama and Mississippi in 1961, the Mississippi Freedom Summer of 1964, the Selma voter registration drive in 1965, and the shift towards the politics of black power within SNCC by 1966. Throughout the interview, he situates the activities of SNCC within the civil rights movement more broadly, focusing on issues of leadership, religion, and politics.
Interviewee: John Lewis    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 02:00:42     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
182.
Samuel James (S. J.) and Leonia Farrar, May 28, 2003. Interview K-0652.
Hard Work and God's Work: Labor and Worship in North Carolina: Samuel and Leonia Farrar remember a lifetime of hard work in rural and urban North Carolina.
Interviewee: Leonia Farrar, Samuel James (S. J.) Farrar    Interviewer: Peggy Van Scoyoc
Duration: 01:29:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
183.
MaVynee Betsch, November 22, 2002. Interview R-0301.
"The Straight Line, It's Like a Disease": An Unconventional Woman Remembers Segregated Jacksonville, Florida: Environmentalist MaVynee Betsch remembers her childhood in an African American neighborhood in Jacksonville, Florida, and her experiences with segregation and development.
Interviewee: MaVynee Betsch    Interviewer: Kieran Taylor
Duration: 00:56:48     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
184.
John Harris, September 5, 2002. Interview R-0185.
Driving Greensboro: Race, Community, and the Taxi Business in Greensboro, North Carolina: John Harris, longtime cab driver and businessman in Greensboro, North Carolina, describes his community in the context of race and redevelopment.
Interviewee: John Harris    Interviewer: Kieran Taylor
Duration: 02:05:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
185.
Robert R. Sampson, October 9, 2002. Interview R-0182.
Urban Renewal and the Decline of Black Business in Greensboro, North Carolina: Pharmacist Robert Sampson describes how urban renewal efforts dispersed a thriving black business community in Greensboro, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Robert R. Sampson    Interviewer: Angela Hornsby
Duration: 00:45:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
186.
Laura B. Waddell, August 6, 2002. Interview R-0175.
A Seamstress in Segregated Savannah: Laura Waddell describes her successful career as a tailor as well as her civic activities in Savannah, Georgia.
Interviewee: Laura B. Waddell    Interviewer: Kieran Taylor
Duration: 01:17:02     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
187.
James Lawson, October 24, 1983. Interview F-0029.
Remembering Friends: James Lawson Recollects His Time as a Civil Rights Activist: James M. Lawson was a key ally of Martin Luther King Jr. and also an important theoretician and practitioner of nonviolent protest. In this interview, he speaks about his relationship with some of the civil rights figures of the time, including Will Campbell, Kelly Miller Smith, Nelle Morton, Myles Horton, James Dombrowski, and James Holloway.
Interviewee: James Lawson    Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 00:42:11     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
188.
Lemuel Delany, July 15, 2005. Interview R-0346.
Upward Mobility: From Raleigh to New York: Lemuel Delany grew up in segregated Raleigh, North Carolina, during the 1920s and 1930s before moving to Harlem in New York City. In this interview, Delany discusses race relations in the South and in the North, offers his reaction to his aunts' book Having Our Say, outlines his family's accomplishments, and explains his disapproval of some of the actions of the NAACP and his disappointment in the impact of desegregation on African American institutions.
Interviewee: Lemuel Delany    Interviewer: Kimberly Hill
Duration: 01:33:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
189.
Joseph Califano, April 5, 1991. Interview L-0125.
HEW Official Recounts the University of North Carolina's Resistance to Desegregation: Joseph Califano served as the Secretary of the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) from 1977 to 1979. He recalls the reasons for the University of North Carolina's opposition to HEW's desegregation criteria.
Interviewee: Joseph Califano    Interviewer: William Link
Duration: 00:24:10     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
190.
Martha Cooley, April 25, 1995. Interview Q-0019.
Quiltings and Cornshuckings: A Childhood in Granville County, North Carolina: Martha Cooley describes her childhood in rural Granville County, North Carolina, during the early part of the twentieth century.
Interviewee: Martha Cooley    Interviewer: Eddie McCoy
Duration: 00:47:18     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
191.
Conrad Odell Pearson, April 18, 1979. Interview H-0218.
Fighting for Civil Rights in Durham, North Carolina: Conrad Odell Pearson grew up in Durham, North Carolina. After obtaining his law degree at Howard School of Law in the early 1930s, Pearson returned to Durham, where he became actively involved in legal struggles against segregation in higher education. In this interview, he describes his participation in various civil rights activities, his perception of African American leaders James Shepard and C. C. Spaulding, and race relations in Durham.
Interviewee: Conrad Odell Pearson    Interviewer: Walter Weare
Duration: 03:18:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
192.
Arthur Raper, January 30, 1974. Interview B-0009-2.
Director of the Commission on Interracial Cooperation Describes His Perception of Jessie Daniel Ames and the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching: Southern sociologist and civil rights activist Arthur Raper discusses his interactions with Jessie Daniel Ames and the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching during his tenure as the research director of the Commission on Interracial Cooperation from 1926 to 1939. Raper describes Ames as an effective but contentious leader.
Interviewee: Arthur Raper    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:04:21     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
193.
Eva Clayton, July 18, 1989. Interview C-0084.
Building Progress: A Black Woman's Effort to Transform Warren County, North Carolina: Activist and politician Eva Clayton describes her years of service in and out of politics in Warren County, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Eva Clayton    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:03:58     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
194.
Blyden Jackson, June 27, 1991. Interview L-0051.
African American Professor Integrates Faculty at University of North Carolina: A native of Louisville, Kentucky, Blyden Jackson devoted his life to education. Beginning as a teacher for the WPA during the Great Depression, Jackson eventually taught at Fisk University and Southern University, before becoming the first African American professor at the University of North Carolina. In this interview, he discusses the trajectory of his academic career, paying particular attention to issues of race and education.
Interviewee: Blyden Jackson    Interviewer: Freddie L. Parker
Duration: 01:09:24     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
195.
Julius L. Chambers, June 18, 1990. Interview L-0127.
Civil Rights Lawyer Reflects on the Desegregation of North Carolina's College System: Julius Chambers served on the UNC Board of Governors from 1972 to 1977. He recalls the tensions between the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare's federal objectives and the University of North Carolina Board officials' control over the desegregation process at post-secondary educational institutions.
Interviewee: Julius L. Chambers    Interviewer: William Link
Duration: 00:56:18     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
196.
Carolyn Rogers, May 22, 2003. Interview K-0656.
Black Educator Describes the Shift from Rural to City Living and School Integration in Cary, North Carolina: Carolyn Farrar Rogers discusses how growing up in rural North Carolina sheltered her from racism and taught her the values of hard work and racial self-worth. These values served her well as a teacher during the early desegregation period.
Interviewee: Carolyn Rogers    Interviewer: Peggy Van Scoyoc
Duration: 01:32:42     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
197.
Charlene Regester, February 23, 2001. Interview K-0216.
Difficulties with School Desegregation as Black Pioneer: Charlene Regester assesses the costs to blacks of school integration in Chapel Hill.
Interviewee: Charlene Regester    Interviewer: Susan Upton
Duration: 00:45:47     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
198.
Floyd B. McKissick Sr., May 31, 1989. Interview L-0040.
Civil Rights Pioneer Discusses His Social Justice Activism in North Carolina: Civil rights activist Floyd McKissick was the first African American student to enroll in the law school at the University of North Carolina. In this interview, he discusses that integration effort, along with subsequent integration battles he faced as a student and as an advocate for civil rights.
Interviewee: Floyd B. McKissick    Interviewer: Bruce Kalk
Duration: 00:49:11     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
199.
Fran Jackson, March 23, 2001. Interview K-0208.
One Student's Reaction to the Integration of Chapel Hill Schools: Fran Jackson discusses her reaction to the integration of Chapel Hill High School.
Interviewee: Fran Jackson    Interviewer: Christa Broadnax
Duration: 00:55:04     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
200.
Barbara Lorie, February 26, 2001. Interview K-0211.
A White Teacher's Experiences in Desegregated North Carolina Schools: Barbara Lorie describes her experiences and teaching philosophy as a teacher at newly integrated, racially charged schools in North Carolina.
Interviewee: Barbara Lorie    Interviewer: Melissa Froemming
Duration: 01:15:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
201.
J. Carlyle Sitterson, November 4 and 6, 1987. Interview L-0030.
UNC Chancellor Reflects on Tumultuous Changes During the Civil Rights Era: J. Carlyle Sitterson discusses his tenure as University of North Carolina chancellor during the 1960s and 1970s. He describes the difficult balance he struck between the Board of Trustees and the student body on issues of student rights.
Interviewee: J. Carlyle Sitterson    Interviewer: Pamela Dean
Duration: 01:30:52     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
202.
E. V. Dacons, March 4, 1991. Interview M-0009.
Black Administrator Recalls His Experiences in Segregated and Desegregated North Carolina High Schools: Ebson V. Dacons recounts his career as a black administrator of segregated and desegregated public high schools in Wilkes County, North Carolina.
Interviewee: E. V. Dacons    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 01:31:59     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
203.
Sam Holton, March 28, 2001. Interview K-0206.
Chapel Hill School Board Member Recollection of School Desegregation Efforts: Sam Holton explains his role in the desegregation of Chapel Hill schools during his tenure on the school board from 1968 to 1974.
Interviewee: Sam Holton    Interviewer: Jenny Matthews
Duration: 01:22:28     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
204.
Daniel H. Pollitt, February 22, 2001. Interview K-0215.
University of North Carolina Lawyer Describes His Civil Rights Activism: Daniel Pollitt describes the process of desegregation in the South. He discusses his involvement with civil rights activism and his relationship with progressive organizations and prominent North Carolinians, including UNC law school dean Henry Brandis and UNC basketball coach Dean Smith.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: David Potorti
Duration: 01:13:41     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
205.
William Fonvielle, August 2, 2002. Interview R-0174.
Black Flight: The Disappearance of Black-Owned Businesses in Downtown Savannah, Georgia: Pharmacist William Fonvielle mourns the passing of black economic autonomy and communal unity in Savannah, Georgia.
Interviewee: William Fonvielle    Interviewer: Kieran Taylor
Duration: 01:05:03     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
206.
Margaret Kennedy Goodwin, September 26, 1997. Interview R-0113.
African American Woman Describes Life as a Single Working Mother in Mid-Twentieth-Century Durham, North Carolina: Margaret Kennedy Goodwin grew up in Durham, North Carolina, during the 1920s and 1930s. In this interview, she describes a thriving African American community in Durham, one that she views as having suffered at the hands of urban renewal during the 1970s and 1980s. In addition, she describes her educational aspirations and her career as a technician in the radiology laboratory at Durham's Lincoln Hospital.
Interviewee: Margaret Kennedy Goodwin    Interviewer: Angela Hornsby
Duration: 01:28:56     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
207.
Louise Pointer Morton, December 12, 1994. Interview Q-0067.
Growing Up in Rural Granville County, North Carolina, in the Early Twentieth Century: Louise Pointer Morton describes life in rural Granville County, North Carolina, during the early twentieth century. In addition to describing social gatherings and living conditions, Morton speaks at length about her formerly enslaved grandmother's role in the founding of the Jonathon (Johnson) Creek Church, alluding to the centrality of religion as a preeminent social institution within southern African American communities.
Interviewee: Louise Pointer Morton    Interviewer: Eddie McCoy
Duration: 00:47:42     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
208.
John Thomas Moore, October 18, 2000. Interview R-0142.
"Blessed and Blessed and Blessed": God, the Devil, and John Thomas Moore: Bishop John Thomas Moore Jr. describes the conflict between God and the devil in his life and the in life of the African American community in Durham, North Carolina.
Interviewee: John Thomas Moore    Interviewer: Christopher Weber
Duration: 01:29:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
209.
William E. White Jr., October 29, 2000. Interview R-0147.
Seeking Fulfillment, Seeking Health: One Man's Encounters with Race, Religion, and Sexuality: William E. White Jr. describes his encounters with religion, race, and sexuality.
Interviewee: William E. White    Interviewer: Ashley Crowe
Duration: 01:04:32     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
210.
Serena Henderson Parker, April 13, 1995. Interview Q-0073.
"Good Eating and Everything in the World You Wanted": Growing Up in Rural North Carolina: Serena Henderson Parker, born in 1923, remembers the rural North Carolina of her childhood.
Interviewee: Serena Henderson Parker    Interviewer: Eddie McCoy
Duration: 00:46:51     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
211.
George A. LeMaistre, April 29, 1985. Interview A-0358.
Race and Politics in Alabama: George LeMaistre remembers Alabama politics from the 1920s to the 1970s, a story troubled by violent racism and the struggle over integration.
Interviewee: George A. LeMaistre    Interviewer: Allen J. Going
Duration: 07:42:36     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 31 excerpts.
212.
Don West, January 22, 1975. Interview E-0016.
"I Came by It Naturally": A Southern Leftist Tries to Change His Homeland: Activist, leftist, poet, and ordained minister Don West remembers a lifetime of union and civil rights activism.
Interviewee: Don West    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, Ray Faherty
Duration: 02:17:46     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 22 excerpts.
213.
Floyd B. McKissick Sr., December 6, 1973. Interview A-0134.
"Just Forget the Damn Differences": Pragmatism and the Civil Rights Movement: Civil rights activist Floyd McKissick evaluates the legacies of the civil rights movement and looks toward its next phase in the 1970s.
Interviewee: Floyd B. McKissick    Interviewer: Jack Bass
Duration: 00:56:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
214.
Thomas Jackson White Jr., March 14, 1986. Interview C-0029-2.
"I Love to Have Opposition": Influence and Interference in Raleigh, North Carolina: Thomas Jackson White Jr. describes his leadership on the State Art Museum Building Commission and his career as a lobbyist for the tobacco industry in North Carolina.
Interviewee: Thomas Jackson White    Interviewer: Pamela Dean
Duration: 02:43:34     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
215.
Margaret Edwards, January 20, 2002. Interview R-0157.
African American Woman From North Carolina Discusses Her Life as a Mormon: Margaret Edwards grew up in a large African American sharecropping family in Ayden, North Carolina, during the 1950s and 1960s. She eventually settled in the Raleigh area. Following her experiences with the Baptist and Pentecostal Holiness churches, she converted to Mormonism in 1998. In this interview, she discusses her role within the Mormon Church as an African American woman; the intersections between race, gender, and religion; and the attitude of other denominations toward Mormonism.
Interviewee: Margaret Edwards    Interviewer: Barbara Copeland
Duration: 01:26:53     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
216.
Adetola Hassan, December 16, 2001. Interview R-0160.
Young Mormon Woman Discusses the Mormon Church in the South: Adetola Hassan, a British citizen of Nigerian descent, was a freshman student at Duke University at the time of this interview in 2001. In the interview, she discusses her Mormon faith, focusing on tensions surrounding Mormonism in the South as well as issues related to gender and race within the church.
Interviewee: Adetola Hassan    Interviewer: Barbara Copeland
Duration: 01:53:36     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
217.
Lillian Taylor Lyons, September 11, 1994. Interview Q-0094.
Race Relations in "Forward-Looking" Oxford, North Carolina, During the Early Twentieth Century: Born and raised in Oxford, North Carolina, in the early twentieth century, Lillian Taylor Lyons discusses her family history, her education, and her career as a teacher. Lyons also speaks at length about race relations in Oxford, arguing that Oxford was especially "forward-looking" in comparison to other southern communities.
Interviewee: Lillian Taylor Lyons    Interviewer: Eddie McCoy
Duration: 01:44:09     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
218.
Guion Griffis Johnson, May 28, 1974. Interview G-0029-3.
A Southern Sociologist Describes Her Education and Her Work in Race Relations: Renowned southern sociologist Guion Griffis Johnson discusses her education, her work with the Institute for Research in Social Sciences, her participation in the Carnegie-Myrdal Study of the Negro in America, and the challenges of being a woman academic during the 1920s and 1930s. Throughout the interview, she emphasizes the challenges and experiences of academics with progressive views of race and gender during that era.
Interviewee: Guion Griffis Johnson    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: 02:04:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
219.
Ella Baker, September 4, 1974. Interview G-0007.
Ella Baker Describes Her Role in the Formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee: Ella Baker was an instrumental figure in the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). In this interview, she offers a candid analysis of the formation of those organizations and an insider's perspective on the role of and interactions between various civil rights leaders, including Martin Luther King Jr.
Interviewee: Ella Baker    Interviewer: Eugene Walker
Duration: 03:34:21     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
220.
Julian Bond, November 1 and 22, 1999. Interview R-0345.
Julian Bond Recalls the Struggle for Civil Rights: Julian Bond recounts a life of civil rights activism in the American South. He discusses his work with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and his connection with other activists, including Ella Baker, Martin Luther King Jr., Bayard Rustin, John Lewis, Fannie Lou Hamer, Bob Moses, and Stokely Carmichael.
Interviewee: Julian Bond    Interviewer: Elizabeth Gritter
Duration: 01:27:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
221.
Rebecca Clayton, December 8, 1988. Interview K-0132.
School Teacher Discusses Her Experiences With School Integration and Its Legacy in Durham, North Carolina: Rebecca Clayton became a teacher in the wake of the Brown v. Board decision during the early 1960s, and in 1970 she went to work in the newly integrated Durham, North Carolina, school district. In this interview, Clayton describes her experiences as a teacher during the height of school desegregation. The interview concludes with her observations on the impact of the growing Latino population on Durham schools.
Interviewee: Rebecca Clayton    Interviewer: Angela Hornsby
Duration: 01:15:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
222.
Billy E. Barnes, November 6, 2003. Interview O-0038.
A Southern Photographer Discusses His Work for the North Carolina Fund: Billy E. Barnes became a photographer in the late 1950s and worked for the McGraw-Hill Publishing Company for several years before going to work for the North Carolina Fund (1964-1968). Barnes devotes most of this interview to a discussion of his work as a documentary photographer for the North Carolina Fund, paying particular attention to his effort to humanize impoverished people as part of the broader War on Poverty.
Interviewee: Billy E. Barnes    Interviewer: Elizabeth Gritter
Duration: 02:38:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
223.
Howard Fuller, December 14, 1996. Interview O-0034.
Anti-Poverty Crusader Calls for Change in Community Organizing: Howard Fuller began his activism in Durham, North Carolina, as a student volunteer for the North Carolina Fund. His experiences as an activist for low-income black residents shaped his lifelong work and involvement in anti-poverty campaigns.
Interviewee: Howard Fuller    Interviewer: Master of Ceremonies
Duration: 00:51:11     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
224.
Lawrence Ridgle, June 3, 1999. Interview K-0143.
Urban Renewal and Division in the African American Community in Durham, North Carolina: Lawrence Ridgle describes his childhood in Durham, North Carolina, during the 1930s and his belief that urban renewal of the 1960s and 1970s ultimately worked to the detriment of African Americans. In this interview—the first of two—he emphasizes the changing nature of the African American community in Durham during his lifetime.
Interviewee: Lawrence Ridgle    Interviewer: Alicia Rouverol
Duration: 01:03:50     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
225.
Lawrence Ridgle, June 9, 1999. Interview K-0144.
Demographic Changes and Challenges in Durham, North Carolina: Lawrence Ridgle, a near-lifelong resident of Durham, North Carolina, discusses his family's work at the American Tobacco Company and his role of leadership in the newly integrated United States Army during the early 1950s. In addition, he discusses the changing nature of the African American community, focusing on perceived threats to its solidarity, and the impact of demographic changes, primarily the rapidly growing Latino community.
Interviewee: Lawrence Ridgle    Interviewer: Alicia Rouverol
Duration: 02:13:25     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
226.
Julia Peaks de-Heer, January 8, 1999. Interview K-0146.
Community Solidarity, Community Decline, and the Role of the Church in the Hopkins Street Neighborhood: Julia Peaks de-Heer describes her childhood in both Stagville and Durham, North Carolina, focusing primarily on her experiences living on Hopkins Street during the 1950s. Throughout the interview, themes of community solidarity, decline, and improvement dominate, with an emphasis on de-Heer's activities with the Greater Zion Wall Church in later years.
Interviewee: Julia Peaks de-Heer    Interviewer: Jill Hemming
Duration: 02:10:02     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
227.
Martina Dunford, February 18, 1999. Interview K-0142.
Program Director of the Edgemont Community Center Describes Her Hopes for Community Betterment: Martina Dunford became the program director of the Edgemont Community Center in Durham, North Carolina, in the 1990s. In this interview, she discusses the work of the center in promoting community solidarity; relations between the predominantly African American population and the rapidly growing Latino population in Edgemont; and race relations in Durham as compared to her experiences in Norfolk, Virginia.
Interviewee: Martina Dunford    Interviewer: Alicia Rouverol
Duration: 01:17:57     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
228.
Jessie Streater, November 10, 2001. Interview R-0165.
"This Must Be What I Am Looking For": An African American on the Mormon Church: Jessie Streater describes Mormon belief and practice and shares her thoughts on the place of African Americans in the Mormon religion.
Interviewee: Jessie Streater    Interviewer: Barbara Copeland
Duration: 01:14:10     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
229.
Kanwal Rahman, July 15, 1999. Interview K-0817.
"I Don't Feel as American as Them": A Bangladeshi Woman's Enduring Connection to Home: Kanwal Rahman, who arrived in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, from Bangladesh in 1991 to study public health, describes her enduring connection to her homeland and her struggle to adjust to the American way of life.
Interviewee: Kanwal Rahman    Interviewer: Rajika Bhandari
Duration: 00:44:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
230.
Ella Baker, April 19, 1977. Interview G-0008.
Leading Others into Light: Ella Baker and the Growth of the Civil Rights Movement: Civil rights activist and Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) mentor Ella Josephine Baker outlines her family history, traces her growing radical tendencies, and explains the catalysts that pushed her into public activism. In this interview she discusses her work not only with SNCC, but also with the Workers' Education Project, the Cooperative League, and the NAACP.
Interviewee: Ella Baker    Interviewer: Sue Thrasher
Duration: 03:09:41     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 21 excerpts.
231.
Pauli Murray, February 13, 1976. Interview G-0044.
A Legal Activist Discusses Her Work in the Civil Rights and Women's Liberation Movements: Pauli Murray was a prominent legal activist within the civil rights and women's liberation movements. In this interview, she discusses her childhood and her education, the events leading up to her decision to pursue a career in law, the evolution of her career, her decision to enter the seminary, and her thoughts on civil rights and women's liberation.
Interviewee: Pauli Murray    Interviewer: Genna Rae McNeil
Duration: 05:18:41     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
232.
Quinton E. Baker, February 23, 2002. Interview K-0838.
Change Over Time: Quinton E. Baker Remembers the Chapel Hill Civil Rights Protests: Quinton E. Baker reflects on how his identity as a black gay man influenced his social activism, especially his role in the 1960s civil rights protests.
Interviewee: Quinton E. Baker    Interviewer: Chris McGinnis
Duration: 02:28:02     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 25 excerpts.
233.
W. Horace Carter, January 17, 1976. Interview B-0035.
Pulitzer Prize-Winning Reporter Describes His Journalistic Campaign Against the Ku Klux Klan: Journalist Walter Horace Carter received the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 for his journalistic campaign against the Ku Klux Klan in his newspaper, the Tabor City Tribune. The interview focuses almost exclusively on the actions of the Klan from 1950 to 1952, including threats made against Carter, connections between local law enforcement and the Klan, and Carter's journalistic campaign against their vigilante tactics.
Interviewee: W. Horace Carter    Interviewer: Jerry Lanier
Duration: 01:19:22     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
234.
Mary T. Mathew, April 25, 1999. Interview K-0815.
"I Don't Miss Anything That I Left Behind": An Indian Assimilates into America: Mary T. Mathew, an immigrant from India and an assistant professor at North Carolina Central University at the time of this interview, describes her successful assimilation into American culture and its effects on her family.
Interviewee: Mary T. Mathew    Interviewer: Rashmi Varma
Duration: 00:51:01     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
235.
Mabel Williams, August 20, 1999. Interview K-0266.
"He Would Not Be Disarmed": Robert Williams, Armed Self-Defense, and Civil Rights in Monroe, North Carolina: Mabel Williams, wife of civil rights activist and advocate of armed self-defense Robert Williams, remembers her husband's efforts to overturn segregation in Monroe, North Carolina, in the 1960s.
Interviewee: Mabel Williams    Interviewer: David Cecelski
Duration: 03:07:53     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 19 excerpts.
236.
Ran Kong, November 25, 2000. Interview K-0269.
"A Mixed Individual": A Cambodian-American Reflects on History, Identity, and Citizenship: Ran Kong, who immigrated to the United States from Cambodia at a young age, reflects on her life as a Cambodian-American and on her immigrant identity.
Interviewee: Ran Kong    Interviewer: Barbara Lau
Duration: 01:50:59     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 18 excerpts.
237.
Asa T. Spaulding, April 13, 1979. Interview C-0013-1.
"A Balanced Life": A Black Actuary Looks Back: Asa T. Spaulding, the first African American actuary in North Carolina and former president of the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, recalls his early life and weighs his contributions to the insurance business and society at large.
Interviewee: Asa T. Spaulding    Interviewer: Walter Weare
Duration: 03:03:04     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
238.
Asa T. Spaulding, April 14, 1979. Interview C-0013-2.
"Step by Step": Desegregation in Durham, North Carolina: Former president of the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company and civic leader Asa T. Spaulding reflects on how his growing influence as a business leader allowed him to make unique contributions to dismantling segregation in Durham.
Interviewee: Asa T. Spaulding    Interviewer: Walter Weare
Duration: 02:01:39     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
239.
Asa T. Spaulding, April 16, 1979. Interview C-0013-3.
"I Have Never Let Differences Prevent Me from Doing a Good Deed": Asa T. Spaulding and Economic Power in Durham, North Carolina: Asa T. Spaulding, the first African American actuary in North Carolina and former president of the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, remembers and reflects on community activism in Durham, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Asa T. Spaulding    Interviewer: Walter Weare
Duration: 04:24:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
240.
Paul Green, May 30, 1975. Interview B-0005-3.
"To Know All Is to Pardon All": The Art and Activism of Paul Green: Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and activist Paul Green—most famous for his symphonic drama The Lost Colony—reflects on social justice and art as he describes his work as a playwright and his efforts as an activist.
Interviewee: Paul Green    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 02:49:34     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
241.
Daniel H. Pollitt, November 27, 1990. Interview L-0064-1.
The Making of a Civil Liberties Lawyer: Family History and the Early Career of Daniel H. Pollitt: This is the first interview in a nine-part series of interviews with civil liberties lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt. In this interview, Pollitt discusses his family history, his early legal career, his work in defending liberals against the House Un-American Activities Committee during the early McCarthy years, and his brief tenure as a law professor at the University of Arkansas.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: Ann McColl
Duration: 01:33:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
242.
Daniel H. Pollitt, November 28, 1990. Interview L-0064-2.
Civil Liberties Lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt Joins the Faculty of the University of North Carolina School of Law: This is the second interview in a nine-part series of interviews with civil liberties lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt. In this interview, Pollitt discusses his decision to join the faculty at the University of North Carolina School of Law in 1957 as well as the history and faculty of the law school.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: Ann McColl
Duration: 00:34:52     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 2 excerpts.
243.
Daniel H. Pollitt, December 13, 1990. Interview L-0064-3.
Changes in the Law School Faculty and Student Body During the Late 1950s and 1960s: This is the third interview in a nine-part series of interviews with civil liberties lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt. In this interview, Pollitt discusses changes in the faculty of the UNC School of Law and the student body, paying particular attention to issues of race, gender, and student involvement in community affairs.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: Ann McColl
Duration: 01:17:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
244.
Daniel H. Pollitt, February 15, 1991. Interview L-0064-4.
UNC Law Professor Discusses Race, Athletics, and Student Activism During the Late 1950s and 1960s: This is the fourth interview in a nine-part series of interviews with civil liberties lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt. In this interview, Pollitt describes his role as the faculty advisor to the student NAACP in the recruitment of pioneering African American athletes at UNC. In addition, he discusses his involvement in student activism as a leader of the student YMCA-YWCA.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: Ann McColl
Duration: 00:55:32     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
245.
Daniel H. Pollitt, February 22, 1991. Interview L-0064-5.
Civil Liberties Lawyer Discusses the AAUP and Academic Freedom at UNC: This is the fifth interview in a nine-part series of interviews with civil liberties lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt. In this interview, Pollitt describes his work the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) during the 1960s and 1970s, paying particular attention to his involvement in the cases of Michael Paull, a graduate student and teaching assistant in the English Department, and Moye Freymann, the founding director of the Carolina Population Center.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: Ann McColl
Duration: 00:57:19     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 2 excerpts.
246.
Daniel H. Pollitt, March 21-22, 1991. Interview L-0064-6.
A UNC Law Professor Recounts the 1969 Food Workers' Strike: This is the sixth interview in a nine-part series of interviews with civil liberties lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt. In this interview, Pollitt offers a vivid retelling of the events that led up to the UNC food workers' strike of 1969, the unfolding of the strike itself, and the reactions of UNC students and faculty.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: Ann McColl
Duration: 01:03:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
247.
Daniel H. Pollitt, April 5, 1991. Interview L-0064-7.
UNC Law Professor Discusses the Speaker Ban Controversy at University of North Carolina: This is the seventh interview in a nine-part series of interviews with civil liberties lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt. In this interview, Pollitt describes the Speaker Ban controversy at the University of North Carolina during the mid-1960s, paying special attention to student, faculty, and administrative reactions to the ban.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: Ann McColl
Duration: 00:52:32     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
248.
Daniel H. Pollitt, April 11, 1991. Interview L-0064-8.
Highlights in the Career of a Civil Liberties Lawyer: This is the eighth interview in a nine-part series of interviews with civil liberties lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt. In this interview, Pollitt offers highlights from his career as a civil liberties lawyer, including cases he took on during the 1980s.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: Ann McColl
Duration: 00:56:03     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
249.
Daniel H. Pollitt, April 17, 1991. Interview L-0064-9.
Civil Liberties Lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt Discusses His Work with Social Justice Organizations: This is the last in a nine-part series of interviews with civil liberties lawyer Daniel H. Pollitt. In this interview, Pollitt describes his work with a variety of organizations that shared his vision of protecting civil liberties.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: Ann McColl
Duration: 01:21:41     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
250.
Billy E. Barnes, October 7, 2003. Interview O-0037.
Documentary Photographer Describes His Work with the North Carolina Fund: Billy E. Barnes is a photographer who is known for his documentary work on racial and economic justice issues in the 1950s and 1960s. In this interview, Barnes discusses his work with the North Carolina Fund and the organization's efforts at breaking the cycle of poverty in North Carolina. He also offers descriptions of his photography of impoverished people in North Carolina.
Interviewee: Billy E. Barnes    Interviewer: Elizabeth Gritter
Duration: 02:32:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
251.
Suzanne Post, June 23, 2006. Interview U-0178.
Suzanne Post and the Fight for Civil Rights in Louisville, Kentucky: Civil rights activist Suzanne Post speaks about what motivated her commitment to social justice. Though she is best known for her work to overcome race-based segregated education in Louisville and to launch Louisville's Metropolitan Housing Coalition, Post insists that her most important work centered on women's rights.
Interviewee: Suzanne Post    Interviewer: Sarah Thuesen
Duration: 01:47:27     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 16 excerpts.
252.
Angela Brightfeather, January 24, 2002. Interview K-0841.
A Discussion of Transgender Identity and its Relationship to the GLBT Community in North Carolina: Before moving to North Carolina in 1999, Angela Brightfeather spent most of her life in Syracuse, New York, where she was actively involved in the transgender community. In this interview, Brightfeather describes her own transgender experience, variations in transgenderism, the history of transgender people, the relationship of transgender people to the GLBT community, and her activist work for transgender rights in North Carolina.
Interviewee: Angela Brightfeather    Interviewer: Chris McGinnis
Duration: 02:30:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
253.
James Folsom, December 28, 1974. Interview A-0319.
How a Southern Governor Opposed Racial Violence, Minority Rule, and Financial Waste in Alabama: James Folsom served as the governor of Alabama for two terms in the 1940s, during which time he worked to change racial politics and improve the plight of black Americans. As governor, he opposed the poll tax, appealed for reapportionment of state funding, and avoided campaign slogans and gimmicks based on racist rhetoric. He describes how he developed liberal ideas on race and why he believed that race was no longer a viable political issue in the South.
Interviewee: James Folsom    Interviewer: Allen Tullos, Candace Waid
Duration: 01:48:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
254.
Robert Coles, October 24, 1974. Interview B-0002.
Child Psychologist and Pioneering Oral Historian Discusses Methodologies of Oral History: Robert Coles is a child psychiatrist and writer at Harvard who was a pioneer in the emerging field of academic oral history during the 1960s and 1970s. In this interview, Coles discusses the purposes of oral history, his thoughts on academia and writing, and methodologies of oral history, especially in reference to the use of tape recorders.
Interviewee: Robert Coles    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:26:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
255.
Mary Moore, August 17, 2006. Interview U-0193.
Civil and Labor Rights Activist Discusses the Struggle for Equality in Birmingham, Alabama: Mary Ann Moore was only a high school student when she began participating in civil rights activities in Birmingham, Alabama, in the 1960s. After becoming a laboratory technician at the VA Hospital in Birmingham, Moore followed family tradition by becoming an active member of the union. She discusses her social justice activism in this interview while drawing connections between the civil rights and the labor rights movements of the second half of the twentieth century.
Interviewee: Mary Moore    Interviewer: Sarah Thuesen
Duration: 01:44:22     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
256.
John Seigenthaler, December 24 and 26, 1974. Interview A-0330.
Southern Journalist Discusses His Path from Investigative Journalist to His Position in the Kennedy Administration: Investigative reporter John Seigenthaler discusses his early career as a journalist at The Tennessean of Nashville during the 1950s, his work with Robert F. Kennedy during the 1960s, and his role as the editor of The Tennessean into the mid-1960s. Seigenthaler focuses on the unique nature of southern journalism and the homogenization of southern culture during the 1960s and 1970s.
Interviewee: John Seigenthaler    Interviewer: William Finger, Jim Tramel
Duration: 03:55:39     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
257.
Robert Giles, September 10, 1987. Interview C-0063.
North Carolina Public School Policy Maker Recalls State Politicians' Response to the Brown Ruling: Robert Giles recalls state politicians' efforts to hinder total school integration in North Carolina through the use of moderate token desegregation and effective state policy.
Interviewee: Robert Giles    Interviewer: Jay Jenkins
Duration: 01:11:37     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
258.
Mack Pearsall, May 25, 1988. Interview C-0057.
Remembering the Pearsall Plan in North Carolina: Mack Pearsall recalls his father's role in the Pearsall Plan, a school desegregation strategy in post-Brown North Carolina that allowed parents to move their children to non-integrated schools. He expresses faith that economic progress will positively affect the state's race relations.
Interviewee: Mack Pearsall    Interviewer: Walter E. Campbell
Duration: 01:03:09     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
259.
George Esser, June-August 1990. Interview L-0035.
Organizing Progress: Funding Social Justice in 1960s North Carolina: George Esser remembers his contributions to the North Carolina Fund and pulls back the curtain on a network of organizations that worked for social justice in the 1960s.
Interviewee: George Esser    Interviewer: Frances A. Weaver
Duration: 07:31:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 21 excerpts.
260.
Viola Turner, April 17, 1979. Interview C-0016.
Intersections of Race, Class, and Gender at North Carolina Mutual: In this second part of an extensive two-part interview series, Viola Turner discusses race relations in Durham and her experiences working for North Carolina Mutual. Turner offers vivid and detailed anecdotes that reveal the intricate social and professional network of Durham, primarily in the 1920s and 1930s.
Interviewee: Viola Turner    Interviewer: Walter Weare
Duration: 06:28:10     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 15 excerpts.
261.
Thelma Stevens, February 13, 1972. Interview G-0058.
Building Bridges: A White Southerner's Devotion to Improving Race Relations: Thelma Stevens was the director of the Bethlehem Center in Augusta, Georgia, and the Superintendent of Christian Social Relations of the Women's Missionary Council for the Methodist Episcopal Church. In this interview, she describes her childhood in rural Mississippi, her education, and her work with the Methodist Church, all in relationship to her lifelong devotion to improving race relations in the South.
Interviewee: Thelma Stevens    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, Bob Hall
Duration: Unknown     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
262.
Ted Fillette, March 2, 2006. Interview U-0185.
Southern Lawyer Recalls How He Came to Advocate for the Rights of Marginalized Groups: This is the first interview in a two-part series with southern lawyer Ted Fillette of the Legal Aid Society of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. Fillette describes his childhood in Mobile, Alabama; his involvement in civil rights activism as a student at Duke during the 1960s; his work with the VISTA program in Boston; and his early work as a legal advocate of people displaced by urban renewal in Charlotte, North Carolina, during the 1970s.
Interviewee: Ted Fillette    Interviewer: Sarah Thuesen
Duration: 01:21:04     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
263.
Charles M. Jones, November 8, 1976. Interview B-0041.
A Presbyterian Minister Recalls His Decades of Activism in Chapel Hill: Presbyterian minister Charles Jones recounts his civil rights activism in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, from the 1930s to the 1960s.
Interviewee: Charles M. Jones    Interviewer: Joseph A. Herzenberg
Duration: 01:51:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
264.
Pat Cusick, June 19, 1989. Interview L-0043.
Civil Rights Activism in Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Pat Cusick recalls his participation in the civil rights movement in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Imprisoned for his role in these demonstrations, he describes the formative impact his incarceration had in stirring up his radicalism, emboldening his support of nonviolent strategies, and connecting with other like-minded activists. Cusick also discusses coming to terms with his homosexuality.
Interviewee: Pat Cusick    Interviewer: Pamela Dean
Duration: 02:34:47     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 19 excerpts.
265.
Virginius Dabney, June 10-13, 1975. Interview A-0311-1.
Virginius Dabney Recalls His Newspaper Career in Richmond, Virginia: Virginius Dabney recounts his early experiences as a reporter for the Richmond News Leader as well as his later stint as the editor of that newspaper. He also discusses his attitudes about the role of reporters in the political and social arenas, and his work with the Southern Regional Council.
Interviewee: Virginius Dabney    Interviewer: Daniel Jordan, William H. Turpin
Duration: 05:09:51     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 22 excerpts.
266.
George Miller, January 19, 1991. Interview M-0015.
Black North Carolina Principal Recounts the Inner Workings of a Desegregated School: George Miller describes his career as a black administrator in desegregated schools.
Interviewee: George Miller    Interviewer: Goldie F. Wells
Duration: 01:31:41     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
267.
Diane English, May 19, 2006. Interview U-0183.
Community Activist Describes the Quest of Home Ownership: Diane English recalls her job experiences and quest for homeownership in Charlotte, North Carolina, beginning in the late 1960s. She also discusses her role as an activist for neighborhood safety and her fight to save her neighborhood from gentrification.
Interviewee: Diane English    Interviewer: Sarah Thuesen
Duration: 01:39:37     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
268.
Diane English, May 20 2006. Interview U-0184.
Charlotte Neighborhood Activist Discusses Struggles and Successes: Diane English describes her activism in the Belmont neighborhood of Charlotte, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Diane English    Interviewer: Sarah Thuesen
Duration: 00:46:50     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
269.
Bill Hull, June 21, 2001. Interview K-0844.
Liberation and Fear: Gay Culture in Chapel Hill: Bill Hull describes the social environment for gay men in Chapel Hill from the 1960s to the beginning of the twenty-first century.
Interviewee: Bill Hull    Interviewer: Chris McGinnis
Duration: 01:34:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
270.
Chandrika Dalal, July 22, 1999. Interview K-0814.
Indian Immigrant Discusses Her Difficulties in Adjusting to American Life: Chandrika Dalal describes her experiences as an Indian immigrant in the United States.
Interviewee: Chandrika Dalal    Interviewer: Andrew Jilani
Duration: 01:07:21     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
271.
James Perry, May 25, 2006. Interview U-0251.
Fair Housing Advocate Discusses the Impact of Hurricane Katrina on the Housing Market: James Perry, executive director of the New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center in New Orleans, argues that Hurricane Katrina exacerbated and highlighted existing racial and economic tensions in that city. He discusses the fair housing efforts in the area and offers his views on civil rights activities in post-Katrina New Orleans.
Interviewee: James Perry    Interviewer: Andy Horowitz
Duration: 01:17:31     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 1 excerpts.
272.
Malik Rahim, May 23, 2006. Interview U-0252.
Political Activist Discusses Racism in New Orleans: Malik Rahim addresses the view of New Orleans that news organizations broadcast after Katrina devastated that city. He discusses his political activism and assesses the city's social and economic future after the storm.
Interviewee: Malik Rahim    Interviewer: Pamela Hamilton
Duration: 03:06:21     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 1 excerpts.
273.
Lee Boe, June 2, 2006. Interview U-0224.
St. Bernard Parish Resident's Experience with Hurricane Katrina: Lee Boe offers a detailed account of the arrival and effects of Hurricane Katrina on St. Bernard Parish. He describes the role of the federal government and local agencies in the process of recovery post-Katrina. He also discusses his hopes for the future of New Orleans.
Interviewee: Lee Boe    Interviewer: Elizabeth Shelborne
Duration: 01:20:06     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 1 excerpts.
274.
Jacquelyn Clarkson, June 9, 2006. Interview U-0228.
Staying with her city: Jacquelyn Brechtel Clarkson shares her vision for New Orleans: Jacquelyn Brechtel Clarkson, a former real estate agent and a councilwoman of New Orleans and Louisiana legislator, remained in New Orleans during Katrina, working with the mayor from his headquarters in the Hyatt Hotel. She expresses her concerns development issues and historic preservation post-Katrina, and she does not believe that the city is doing enough to help residents return.
Interviewee: Jacquelyn Clarkson    Interviewer: Pamela Hamilton
Duration: 00:48:19     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 1 excerpts.
275.
Rhonda Lind, June 4, 2006. Interview U-0240.
"Kind of a makeshift life": Rhonda Lind adjusts to living in St. Bernard Parish post-Hurricane Katrina: Rhonda Lind was raised in the Ninth Ward and moved to St. Bernard Parish in 1973. Hurricane Katrina changed everything about her life, but the biggest losses have been the irreplaceable items such as photographs. She resented the fact that the news media never reported what was happening in St. Bernard Parish, and she says even the rescuers ignored her parish.
Interviewee: Rhonda Lind    Interviewer: Elizabeth Shelbourne
Duration: 02:05:29     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 1 excerpts.
276.
Pamela Mahogany, June 4, 2006. Interview U-0243.
A Firsthand Account Living through the Eye of Storm: Pamela Mahogany describes her family's and friends' harrowing escape from the floodwaters in post-Katrina New Orleans. She also discusses her attempts to get low-income public housing residents to return to New Orleans.
Interviewee: Pamela Mahogany    Interviewer: Joshua Guild
Duration: 00:36:48     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 1 excerpts.
277.
Ira Padnos and Shmuela Padnos, May 30, 2006. Interview U-0249.
Cultural and civic life in New Orleans before and after Hurricane Katrina: Ira and Shmuela Padnos are not hopeful the city will ever return to what it was, but they do hope that the residents will return so that the depth of the culture will return. For that to happen, they say, issues such as affordable housing must be addressed. Ira discusses his work with the Mystic Knights of Mau Mau, a secret society dedicated to bringing attention to roots music.
Interviewee: Ira Padnos, Shmuela Padnos    Interviewer: Megan Pugh
Duration: 01:32:30     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 1 excerpts.
278.
Jerry Washington Ward Jr., June 2, 2006. Interview U-0261.
"At least I could see my house": Professor Jerry Washington Ward Jr. describes Dillard University before and after Katrina: English professor Jerry Washington Ward Jr. describes Dillard University before Hurricane Katrina. He discusses the deal Dillard administrators made with Hilton Hotels to use their buildings, enabling them to return to New Orleans.
Interviewee: Jerry Washington Ward    Interviewer: Joshua Guild
Duration: 01:40:58     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 1 excerpts.
279.
Kalamu ya Salaam, June 5, 2006. Interview U-0264.
Telling a city's story: Kalamu ya Salaam discusses his work in New Orleans: Journalist Kalamu ya Salaam has lived in New Orleans all of his life and has long been a part of the cultural life of the city. Currently, he works at The Center, a writing program in the public schools. His goal is to produce students who will have learned how to think about the problems facing New Orleans and the United States.
Interviewee: Kalamu ya Salaam    Interviewer: Joshua Guild
Duration: 00:56:47     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 1 excerpts.