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oral histories of the American South


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Interviewee:Eula McGill
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1.
Eula McGill, December 12, 1974. Interview G-0039.
A Life in the Textile Unions: Lifelong textile worker Eula McGill shares her thoughts on the benefits of Alabama textile unions.
Interviewee: Eula McGill    Interviewer: Lewis Lipsitz
Duration: 00:48:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
2.
Eula McGill, February 3, 1976. Interview G-0040-1.
A Southern Woman Becomes a Leader in the Labor Movement: Part I: Eula McGill grew up in Sugar Valley, Georgia, during the early twentieth century. Raised in a working class family, McGill had to leave school because of her family's economic hardships and began to work in a textile mill as a spinner at the age of 14. By the late 1920s, McGill had moved to Alabama, where she became a leader in the labor movement in Selma. Throughout the Great Depression, McGill primarily worked as a labor organizer, first for the Women's Trade Union League and later for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union.
Interviewee: Eula McGill    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 03:49:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
3.
Eula McGill, September 5, 1976. Interview G-0040-2.
A Southern Woman Becomes a Leader in the Labor Movement: Part II: Southern labor organizer Eula McGill explains her views on leadership in the labor movement and the role of workers' education. After rising through the ranks of the labor movement during the Great Depression, McGill continued to work actively to organize workers from the 1940s to the 1970s. She describes in detail various labor campaigns and strikes in the South, as well as her work with the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union and other labor organizations.
Interviewee: Eula McGill    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 02:13:11     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.