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oral histories of the American South
Southern Women

Doctors, lawyers, academics, mill workers, maids, and mothers share their recollections of life and work in the interviews collected here. Many of the women in these interviews were professional or political trailblazers, women who succeeded in male-dominated workplaces or became leaders in civil rights movements. Many were both. And many were women who struggled to feed their families, raise their children, and preserve their communities against the eroding forces of a changing world. This collection highlights the role of women as grassroots activists and the networks they created.

1.
Harriet Herring, February 5, 1976. Interview G-0027.
Studying Labor in North Carolina Mill Towns: Harriet Herring, a sociologist at the University of North Carolina, recalls her efforts to study labor at North Carolina mill towns in the first half of the twentieth century.
Interviewee: Harriet Herring    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson, Nevin Brown
Duration: 03:47:51     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
2.
Modjeska Simkins, May 11, 1990. Interview A-0356.
Fighting for Civil Rights before the Civil Rights Era in South Carolina: Civil rights leader Modjeska Simkins discusses race and civil rights before World War II.
Interviewee: Modjeska Simkins    Interviewer: John Egerton
Duration: 01:29:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
3.
Alice P. Evitt, July 18, 1979. Interview H-0162.
Mill Life in the 1930s: Alice Evitt describes her rural childhood and life as a millworker and mother in North Carolina in the first half of the twentieth century.
Interviewee: Alice P. Evitt    Interviewer: Jim Leloudis
Duration: 01:46:32     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
4.
Rita Jackson Samuels, April 30, 1974. Interview A-0077.
The Growing Presence of African Americans in Georgia's Government: Rita Jackson Samuels, coordinator of the Governor's Council on Human Relations in Atlanta, Georgia, describes her role in expanding the presence of African Americans in Georgia's state government.
Interviewee: Rita Jackson Samuels    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 00:47:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
5.
Letha Ann Sloan Osteen, June 8, 1979. Interview H-0254.
Family and Work in the Farm and Mill Towns of South Carolina: Letha Ann Sloan Osteen discusses how farming and mill work affected the mobility, size, health, and activities of families from about 1900 to the 1930s.
Interviewee: Letha Ann Sloan Osteen    Interviewer: Allen Tullos
Duration: 01:00:16     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 16 excerpts.
6.
Rosamonde R. Boyd, October 29, 1973. Interview G-0011.
A Moderate Approach to Women's Rights: Rosamonde R. Boyd shares her observations on women's activism in the early twentieth century.
Interviewee: Rosamonde R. Boyd    Interviewer: Constance Myers
Duration: 01:29:38     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
7.
Eula McGill, December 12, 1974. Interview G-0039.
A Life in the Textile Unions: Lifelong textile worker Eula McGill shares her thoughts on the benefits of Alabama textile unions.
Interviewee: Eula McGill    Interviewer: Lewis Lipsitz
Duration: 00:48:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
8.
Cornelia Spencer Love, January 26, 1975. Interview G-0032.
A Chapel Hill Daughter Returns: Cornelia Spencer Love, granddaughter of Cornelia Phillips Spencer and sister of Burlington Industries founder J. Spencer Love, discusses her long relationship with the University of North Carolina, the town of Chapel Hill, and its black community.
Interviewee: Cornelia Spencer Love    Interviewer: Lee Kessler
Duration: 01:39:39     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
9.
Kathrine Robinson Everett, April 30, 1985. Interview C-0005.
The Life of a Southern Woman Pioneer: Practicing Law and Combining Work and Family: A pioneer in women's education and women in law, Kathrine Robinson Everett describes what it was like to attend law school in the early twentieth century. In the 1920s, Everett practiced law in Cumberland County and worked to register women to vote after the passage of the 19th Amendment. Following her marriage in 1928, Everett worked alongside her husband, supporting his legal and political career; became involved in local politics in Durham; and worked with various women's organizations.
Interviewee: Kathrine Robinson Everett    Interviewer: Pamela Dean
Duration: 01:05:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
10.
Miriam Slifkin, March 24, 1995. Interview G-0175.
The Role of the Rape Crisis Center and the National Organization for Women in Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Founder of the Orange County Rape Crisis Center Miriam Slifkin discusses the issue of rape within the context of the local women's movement in Orange County, North Carolina. The founding of the OCRCC was illustrative of growing tensions between feminism and anti-feminism in Orange County. The issue of rape is also situated more broadly within the context of the women's liberation movement in the 1970s, especially in relationship to legal changes, the formation of women's studies curriculum, and the relationship between local and national aspects of the movement.
Interviewee: Miriam Slifkin    Interviewer: Lynne Degitz
Duration: 01:50:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
11.
Annie Bell Williams Cheatham, March 21, 1995. Interview Q-0015.
A Sharecropper's Daughter Shares Stories of Slavery: A black sharecropper's daughter discusses her difficult upbringing on the farm and the many stories of slavery on which she was raised.
Interviewee: Annie Bell Williams Cheatham    Interviewer: Eddie McCoy
Duration: 01:12:37     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
12.
Bonnie E. Cone, January 7, 1986. Interview C-0048.
A Southern Woman Helps Establish a College in Charlotte, North Carolina: Bonnie Cone describes her career as an educator in South Carolina and North Carolina during the first half of the twentieth century. After teaching at Duke University during World War II, she moved to Charlotte, North Carolina, and became one of the primary personages behind the successful establishment of a university in that city.
Interviewee: Bonnie E. Cone    Interviewer: Lynn Haessly
Duration: 01:51:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
13.
Harriette Arnow, April, 1976. Interview G-0006.
A Novelist from the South Remembers Her Life: Southern novelist Harriette Arnow discusses what it was like to grow up in Kentucky during the 1910s and 1920s. The teacher-turned-writer focuses especially on her family relationships, her experiences in school and in teaching, her goals as a writer, and her views on marriage and family.
Interviewee: Harriette Arnow    Interviewer: Mimi Conway
Duration: 04:31:49     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
14.
Lindy Boggs, January 31, 1974. Interview A-0082.
A Congresswoman from Louisiana Discusses the Evolution of Louisiana Politics since the 1930s: Louisiana Congresswoman Lindy Boggs discusses changes in Louisiana politics dating back to the 1930s, when she participated in the People's League, and through the 1950s and 1960s, which saw the gradual elimination of the "race issue" in politics. Boggs offers her thoughts on the nature of the Louisiana congressional delegation, the role of the South in Congress, and the impact of the women's movement on Congress during the 1970s.
Interviewee: Lindy Boggs    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 00:42:27     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
15.
Ethel Bowman Shockley, June 24, 1977. Interview H-0045.
A Mother and Daughter Describe Life and Work in a North Carolina Mill Town: Ethel Bowman Shockley and her daughter Hazel Shockley Cannon describe life and work in the mill town of Glen Raven, North Carolina. Shockley worked at the Plaid Mill from 1927 to 1964; she describes how working conditions changed through the Depression, World War II, and the postwar years.
Interviewee: Ethel Bowman Shockley    Interviewer: Cliff Kuhn, Mary Frederickson
Duration: 01:02:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
16.
Eula McGill, February 3, 1976. Interview G-0040-1.
A Southern Woman Becomes a Leader in the Labor Movement: Part I: Eula McGill grew up in Sugar Valley, Georgia, during the early twentieth century. Raised in a working class family, McGill had to leave school because of her family's economic hardships and began to work in a textile mill as a spinner at the age of 14. By the late 1920s, McGill had moved to Alabama, where she became a leader in the labor movement in Selma. Throughout the Great Depression, McGill primarily worked as a labor organizer, first for the Women's Trade Union League and later for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union.
Interviewee: Eula McGill    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 03:49:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
17.
Eula McGill, September 5, 1976. Interview G-0040-2.
A Southern Woman Becomes a Leader in the Labor Movement: Part II: Southern labor organizer Eula McGill explains her views on leadership in the labor movement and the role of workers' education. After rising through the ranks of the labor movement during the Great Depression, McGill continued to work actively to organize workers from the 1940s to the 1970s. She describes in detail various labor campaigns and strikes in the South, as well as her work with the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union and other labor organizations.
Interviewee: Eula McGill    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 02:13:11     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
18.
Carroll Lupton, April 2, 1980. Interview H-0028.
A North Carolina Doctor Describes Practicing Medicine in a Mill Town: North Carolina doctor Carroll Lupton recalls his days practicing medicine in the mill town of Burlington, North Carolina. Focusing primarily on the 1930s, Lupton talks about providing medical care to poor mill workers. Lupton emphasizes medical treatment for pregnant women, treatment of venereal disease, and popular medical remedies of the day.
Interviewee: Carroll Lupton    Interviewer: Mary Murphy
Duration: 01:08:25     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
19.
Carrie Lee Gerringer, August 11, 1979. Interview H-0077.
Making Ends Meet in the North Carolina Textile Mills: Courtship, Family, and Work: Carrie Lee Gerringer describes what it was like to work in the textile mills in Bynum, North Carolina, from the 1920s into the post-World War II years. She discusses growing up in a working class family, focusing especially on balancing family and work. Married at sixteen, Gerringer worked in the textile mills throughout her adult life, struggling to make ends meet while raising six children.
Interviewee: Carrie Lee Gerringer, Carrie Lee Gerringer    Interviewer: Douglas Denatale, Douglas DeNatale
Duration: 01:46:52     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
20.
Viola Turner, April 15, 1979. Interview C-0015.
From Macon, Georgia, to Durham, North Carolina: An African American Woman Remembers Her Childhood and Early Adult Years in the South: Viola Turner, who served as treasurer of North Carolina Mutual Insurance Company, describes her childhood in Macon, Georgia, and her experiences in Durham, North Carolina. In remembering her life experiences in the early twentieth century, she focuses particularly on education, race relations, the importance of skin color, and segregation in business and leisure activities in the South.
Interviewee: Viola Turner    Interviewer: Walter Weare
Duration: 03:52:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
21.
Elizabeth Brooks, October 2, 1974. Interview E-0058.
An African American Woman Discusses Her Role in the UNC Food Workers Strike of 1969: Elizabeth Brooks was one of the leaders of the UNC Food Workers Strike of 1969. As a new worker in the Lenoir Dining Hall, Brooks helped to organize the food workers with the help of Preston Dobbins and the Black Student Movement. This interview focuses on the first strike, which was sparked by the unexpected firing of one worker, low wages, and withheld back pay for overtime.
Interviewee: Elizabeth Brooks    Interviewer: Beverly Jones
Duration: 01:04:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
22.
Anne Barnes, January 30, 1989. Interview C-0049.
Overcoming the Barriers: One Woman's Fight against Racial and Gender Stereotypes in North Carolina's Political System: From 1981 to 1996, Anne Barnes sat in the North Carolina House of Representatives for Orange County. While there, she focused on issues of social justice, especially poverty, education, prison reform, civil rights and women's rights. In this 1989 interview, she explains her motivations to become involved in the political arena and discusses some of the political campaigns she has been associated with, including her own.
Interviewee: Anne Barnes    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:28:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
23.
Paul and Pauline Griffith, May 30, 1980. Interview H-0247.
A Husband and Wife Describe Their Life As Textile Mill Workers in Greenville, South Carolina: Paul and Pauline Griffith spent their working careers in the Judson Mill in Greenville, South Carolina. They offer an overview on conditions in the mill and how the work changed from the 1920s into the 1970s.
Interviewee: Paul Griffith, Pauline Griffith    Interviewer: Allen Tullos
Duration: 02:29:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
24.
Frances Farenthold, December 14, 1974. Interview A-0186.
Texas State Legislator Describes Changes in Texas Politics During the Late 1960s and Early 1970s: A two-term member of the Texas state legislature, Frances Farenthold describes reform efforts in Texas politics during the late 1960s and early 1970s. In addition, Farenthold talks about what she perceives as a decline in overt racism during the post-World War II years, the role of women, and other demographic and sociocultural changes in Texas politics.
Interviewee: Frances Farenthold    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 01:27:39     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
25.
Flake and Nellie Meyers, August 11, 1979. Interview H-0133.
A Southern Husband and Wife Describe Life and Working Conditions: Flake and Nellie Meyers describe what it was like to live and work in and around Conover, North Carolina, during the early to mid-twentieth century. As a worker in various furniture companies and as the foreman at the Southern Desk Company, Flake Meyers describes in vivid detail the various kinds of skills involved in furniture making, the role of machinery in the industry, and workplace relationships. Nellie Meyers similarly describes the kinds of family labor systems and social customs that shaped their lives.
Interviewee: Flake Meyers, Nellie Meyers    Interviewer: Patty Dilley
Duration: 01:59:28     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
26.
Naomi Elizabeth Morris, November 11 and 16, 1982, and March 29, 1983. Interview B-0050.
A North Carolina Woman Describes Becoming a Lawyer and a Founding Member of the North Carolina Court of Appeals: Naomi Elizabeth Morris grew up in Wilson, North Carolina, during the 1920s and 1930s. After graduating from college in the early 1940s, she worked as a legal secretary before attending the School of Law at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. One of the only women to graduate with her class in 1955, Morris practiced law for twelve years before becoming one of the original judges to serve on the North Carolina Court of Appeals.
Interviewee: Naomi Elizabeth Morris    Interviewer: Pat Devine
Duration: 02:26:29     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
27.
Louise Cole, March 16, 1995. Interview G-0157.
A Mormon Woman Describes Her Involvement in the Orange County, North Carolina, School District: Louise Cole, a devout Mormon, discusses her childhood in Baltimore, Maryland, and her education in microbiology and biochemistry at Brigham Young University in the mid-1960s. In 1977, Cole settled in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, with her family. In the late 1980s, she became actively involved in Putting Children First, a group concerned with issues in school curriculum such as multiculturalism and sex education and its impact on their children.
Interviewee: Louise Cole    Interviewer: Priscilla Murphy
Duration: 01:26:05     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
28.
Julia Virginia Jones, October 6, 1997. Interview J-0072.
The Professional Development of a Female Judge: Julia Virginia Jones traces the development of her professional career, which culminated in a federal judgeship. She illuminates the impact her gender had on her growth in the legal field.
Interviewee: Julia Virginia Jones    Interviewer: Nancy Sara Friedman
Duration: 02:55:18     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
29.
Isabella Cannon, Spring 1993. Interview G-0188.
First Woman Mayor of Raleigh, North Carolina, Commemorates the City's Bicentennial: Isabella Cannon was the first woman mayor of Raleigh, North Carolina. Elected in 1977, at the age of 73, the "old lady who wore tennis shoes" was a staunch advocate for community growth and revitalization. During her tenure, she worked to push through the Long Range Comprehensive Plan, to reconcile tensions between the city and the police and fire departments, strengthen the relationship between the city and the state, and to revitalize the downtown area.
Interviewee: Isabella Cannon    Interviewer: Jim Clark
Duration: 01:22:54     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
30.
Frances Hogan, May 23, 1991, and June 3, 1991. Interview L-0044.
The First Director of Women's Athletics at UNC-Chapel Hill Discusses the Evolution of Women's Collegiate Sports: Frances Hogan was in charge of finding facilities, equipment, and competitions for the women's athletics program at the University of North Carolina from 1946 to the 1970s. She discusses how students and coaches worked around the limitations to plan their own tournaments and occasionally succeeded on the national level. She describes the change from club sports to NCAA division sports and the introduction of Title IX in the 1970s. The interview ends with her summary of why the program is successful.
Interviewee: Frances Hogan    Interviewer: Mary Jo Festle
Duration: Array     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
31.
Guion Griffis Johnson, August 19, 1974. Interview G-0029-1.
The Work of a Female Academic at the University of North Carolina, 1923 to 1934: Guion Griffis Johnson was among the first generation of female professional historians and a pioneer of social history. In this interview, she discusses the work she did for Dr. Howard Odum of the University of North Carolina sociology department from 1923 until 1934. She also describes the research she did on St. Helena's Island and on antebellum North Carolina while working toward her Ph.D. She explains how she lost her job at the University of North Carolina in 1930 but continued to work until she and her husband transferred to Baylor College in 1934.
Interviewee: Guion Griffis Johnson    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson, Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:00:11     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
32.
Miriam Bonner Camp, April 15, 1976. Interview G-0013.
A Southern Woman Describes Academia and Workers Education Programs in the Early Twentieth Century: Miriam Bonner Camp describes growing up in Washington, North Carolina, in the early twentieth century, focusing specifically on her mother's strong influence, opportunities for women in the community, and race relations. She moved to California in 1909, and received degrees in English education from Berkeley. She describes coeducational life in college, her experiences teaching at North Carolina College for Women in the 1920s, and her involvement in the women worker education programs in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
Interviewee: Miriam Bonner Camp    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: Unknown     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
33.
Eleanor Copenhaver Anderson, November 5, 1974. Interview G-0005.
Female Activist Recalls Her Work with the YWCA: Eleanor Copenhaver Anderson remembers her work with the YWCA industrial department over the course of forty years. She describes the impact liberalism and communism had on organizing textile mill labor unions.
Interviewee: Eleanor Copenhaver Anderson    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: Unknown     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
34.
Louise Riggsbee Jones, September 20, 1976. Interview H-0085-1.
A Southern Woman Describes Growing Up in a Mill Town: Louise Riggsbee Jones describes growing up in the cotton mill town of Bynum, North Carolina, during the early twentieth century. She discusses her family and household economy, the role of religion in the community, her experiences in school, her work as a spinner in the cotton mill, and the different ways in which people received medical care in this small mill community.
Interviewee: Louise Riggsbee Jones    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: 02:02:29     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
35.
Louise Riggsbee Jones, October 13, 1976. Interview H-0085-2.
A Southern Woman Describes Life and Work in a Cotton Mill Town: Louise Riggsbee Jones describes life and work in Bynum, North Carolina, a cotton mill town, during the first half of the twentieth century. Jones discusses the role of religion, marriage, and family in her life and in the community. In addition, she describes working as a winder in the cotton mill, focusing on such issues as work conditions, gender, balancing work and family, relationships between workers, and workers' benefits.
Interviewee: Louise Riggsbee Jones    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson, Mary Frederickson
Duration: 02:12:05     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
36.
Frances Pauley, July 18, 1974. Interview G-0046.
A White Southern Woman Describes Her Involvement in the Civil Rights Movement: Frances Pauley was born and raised in Decatur, Georgia, during the early twentieth century. An advocate for the poor and of racial integration, Pauley served as president of the Georgia League of Women Voters in the 1940s and 1950s, where she focused specifically on integration of public schools. In 1960, she became director of the Georgia Council on Human Relations and worked within the civil rights movement to promote African American leadership and interracial organizations.
Interviewee: Frances Pauley    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:56:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
37.
Virginia Foster Durr, March 13, 14, 15, 1975. Interview G-0023-1.
Emerging from a Cocoon: How Virginia Foster Durr Became a Civil Rights Activist: Virginia Foster Durr discusses her early life and how she became aware of the social justice problems plaguing twentieth-century America. In this first part of a three-interview series, Durr describes her life on the plantation when she was a child; race issues in Birmingham, where she grew up; and how her views began to change when she left Birmingham to attend Wellesley College.
Interviewee: Virginia Foster Durr    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, Sue Thrasher
Duration: 06:16:45     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 39 excerpts.
38.
Ellen Black Winston, December 2, 1974. Interview G-0064.
Southern Woman Describes her Views on Social Welfare as the Commissioner of Welfare: Ellen Black Winston was born and raised in North Carolina. She received her doctorate in sociology in 1930. Actively involved in issues of social welfare in North Carolina, Winston was appointed as the North Carolina Commissioner of Public Welfare in 1944 and went on to become the first United States Commissioner of Welfare in 1963. In this interview, she describes problems and opportunities for professional women, her goals to improve standards of social welfare in North Carolina, and her work with various branches of government.
Interviewee: Ellen Black Winston    Interviewer: Annette Smith
Duration: 01:54:23     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
39.
Virginia Foster Durr, March 13, 14, 15, 1975. Interview G-0023-2.
Emerging from a Cocoon: How Virginia Foster Durr Became a Civil Rights Activist: In this fast-paced 1975 interview, Virginia Foster Durr remembers her growing awareness of social problems in the South, and continues sharing her life stories through 1948. Along with her husband Clifford Durr, Virginia recounts their move to Washington, D.C., particularly her disaffection with social society and her transition to political action.
Interviewee: Virginia Foster Durr    Interviewer: Sue Thrasher
Duration: 07:11:08     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 41 excerpts.
40.
Virginia Foster Durr, October 16, 1975. Interview G-0023-3.
Virginia Foster Durr on the Southern Response to the New Deal: This is the final interview in a series of three with Virginia Foster Durr. Since the previous session, Clifford Durr had died, making the interview feel very different from the two in which he had taken part. The interview begins with Durr's growing awareness of racial matters and her activism during their life among the New Dealers in Washington, D.C. Among the topics she touches on are the anti-communism of the 1950s, sexual discrimination on Capitol Hill, and the southern reaction to Roosevelt's New Deal policies.
Interviewee: Virginia Foster Durr    Interviewer: Sue Thrasher
Duration: 11:40:12     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 41 excerpts.
41.
Eulalie Salley, September 15, 1973. Interview G-0054.
Eulalie Salley Talks About the Battle for Women's Suffrage: Eulalie Salley, a suffragist from South Carolina, describes the effort of American suffragists to bring about the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, the issues that mobilized male and female supporters of women's suffrage, important leaders in the movement, and the issues facing women today.
Interviewee: Eulalie Salley    Interviewer: Constance Myers
Duration: 02:06:01     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
42.
Geraldine Ray, September 13, 1977. Interview R-0128.
Growing Up as an Unofficial Nurse and Farm Girl in Rural North Carolina: Geraldine Ray has lived in Barnardsville, North Carolina, nearly her entire life. In this interview, she describes growing up on her family's farm, attending all-black schools, and caring for sick relatives and friends. She describes racial segregation as a problem that seemed less difficult to avoid than segregation and prejudice between local black residents. Geraldine learned several essential skills of farm life from her grandmother and then used them to support the family through illness. The interview concludes with a description of her husband—a childhood friend—and how they chose to raise their children.
Interviewee: Geraldine Ray    Interviewer: Kelly Navies
Duration: 01:21:53     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
43.
Lucy Somerville Howorth, June 20, 22, and 23, 1975. Interview G-0028.
A Southern Woman Crosses Boundaries in Activism, Law, and Politics: Born in 1895, Lucy Somerville Howorth was born and raised in Mississippi. An activist for women's rights from an early age, Howorth was actively involved in the campaign for women's suffrage before she became a lawyer, a judge, and a politician. She describes her involvement in numerous women's organizations, her perceptions of the women who led those organizations, and their evolution over the years.
Interviewee: Lucy Somerville Howorth    Interviewer: Constance Myers
Duration: 08:25:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
44.
Marguerite Tolbert, June 14, 1974. Interview G-0062.
South Carolina Educator Recalls Life Experiences: Marguerite Tolbert worked throughout her life as an educator in South Carolina public schools and universities for adult education. She describes her education and high school graduation through stories from her book, South Carolina's Distinguished Women from Laurens County. She recounts how she earned a scholarship to Winthrop College and met her teaching colleagues Wil Lou Gray and Dr. D. B. Johnson; describes local activism for women's suffrage between 1914 and 1920; and recalls encounters with leaders, including President Hoover and Jane Addams. She concludes by discussing the controversy at Winthrop College over a discrepancy in female teachers' salaries.
Interviewee: Marguerite Tolbert    Interviewer: Constance Myers
Duration: 01:21:06     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
45.
Nancy Palm, December 16, 1974. Interview A-0194.
Republican County Chairperson Describes the Evolution of the Republican Party in Texas: Nancy Palm was the chairperson of the Republican Party in Harris County, Texas, during the 1960s and 1970s. She describes her own transition from liberal to conservative in the 1950s, the importance of political organization to the evolution of the Republican Party in Texas, her perception of women's liberation, and the role of such politicians as John G. Tower, John Connally, George Bush, and Richard Nixon in the rise of southern conservatism.
Interviewee: Nancy Palm    Interviewer: Jack Bass, Walter DeVries
Duration: 00:58:08     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
46.
Tawana Belinda Wilson-Allen, May 11, 2006. Interview U-0098.
Congressional Liaison Shares Her Experiences as a Longtime Community Activist: Tawana Belinda Wilson-Allen recalls her community activist work and her service as a congressional liaison for Congressman Mel Watt. She assesses the tensions between lower-income and wealthier residents in Charlotte, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Tawana Belinda Wilson-Allen    Interviewer: Elizabeth Gritter
Duration: 01:43:06     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
47.
Josephine Wilkins, 1972. Interview G-0063.
Southern Woman Describes Her Involvement in Various Organizations for Social Justice: Josephine Wilkins was born in Athens, Georgia, in 1893. In the 1920s, she became increasingly interested in issues of social justice. In the 1930s, she became the president of the Georgia chapter of the League of Women Voters and helped to found the Citizens' Fact Finding Movement. In addition she describes her involvement and perception of such organizations as the Southern Conference for Human Welfare, the Commission of Interracial Cooperation, and the Southern Regional Council.
Interviewee: Josephine Wilkins    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 02:59:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
48.
Mabel Pollitzer, September 19, 1973. Interview G-0047-1.
Southern Suffragist Discusses Civic Action in Charleston, South Carolina: Mabel Pollitzer was born Charleston, South Carolina, in 1885. After graduating from Columbia University in 1906, she returned to Charleston to teach biology at Memminger, an all-girls school. Pollitzer describes her involvement in the women's suffrage movement, her perception of politicians and women's rights leaders, and her civic work within the community of Charleston.
Interviewee: Mabel Pollitzer    Interviewer: Constance Myers
Duration: 01:46:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
49.
Mabel Pollitzer, June 16, 1974. Interview G-0047-2.
Southern Woman Describes the Suffrage Movement in Charleston, South Carolina: Mabel Pollitzer describes her involvement in the women's suffrage movement in Charleston, South Carolina. In particular, Pollitzer describes the leadership role of Susan Pringle Frost within the movement, the split between the National American Woman Suffrage Association and the National Woman's Party in the 1910s, and her perception of various leaders within the movement in South Carolina.
Interviewee: Mabel Pollitzer    Interviewer: Constance Myers
Duration: 01:47:22     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
50.
Grace Jemison Rohrer, March 16, 1989. Interview C-0069.
An Interview with North Carolina's First Woman in a State Cabinet-Level Position: The first woman to serve in a cabinet-level position in North Carolina, Grace Jemison Rohrer first became involved in politics in the 1960s, organizing the Republican Party in Forsyth County, North Carolina. Rohrer later joined forces with Democratic women in order to establish the North Carolina Women's Political Caucus (NCWPC) in 1971. In 1973, Governor James Holshouser appointed her to serve as the Secretary of Cultural Resources. Throughout the 1970s, Rohrer advocated for women to have a more active role in politics, and she actively supported the Equal Rights Amendment.
Interviewee: Grace Jemison Rohrer    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:30:36     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
51.
Margaret Keesee-Forrester, April 21, 1989. Interview C-0065.
North Carolina Woman Describes Her Experiences in the State Legislature, the Women's Movement, and the Republican Party: Margaret Kessee-Forrester, a native of Greensboro, North Carolina, became the first woman from Guilford County elected to the North Carolina General Assembly. She describes her experiences as a woman serving in the state legislature during the 1970s and 1980s, her involvement in the women's movement, and her stance as a moderate Republican.
Interviewee: Margaret Keesee-Forrester    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:34:08     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
52.
Martha C. McKay, June 13, 1989. Interview C-0076.
Women's Rights Activist Describes Her Involvement in the Democratic Party and the North Carolina Women's Political Caucus During the 1960s and 1970s: Martha McKay was actively involved in student politics at the University of North Carolina before her graduation with a degree in economics in 1941. Here, McKay describes her active involvement in Terry Sanford's gubernatorial campaign, the Democratic Party, and the women's rights movement during the 1960s and 1970s. She discusses her role as a founding member of the North Carolina Women's Political Caucus, the need for effective leadership and organization for women's rights, and the progress women have made in politics.
Interviewee: Martha C. McKay    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom, Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:54:07     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
53.
Martha C. McKay, March 29, 1974. Interview A-0324.
North Carolina Women's Rights Activist Describes the 1973 Defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment in the General Assembly: Martha McKay, women's rights activist and Democratic Party member, describes the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment in the North Carolina General Assembly in 1973. Focusing on the role of the North Carolina Women's Political Caucus (NCWPC) in lobbying for ratification of the amendment, McKay describes how the opposition successfully organized to defeat the amendment and how that defeat affected the NCWPC.
Interviewee: Martha C. McKay    Interviewer: Belinda Riggsbee
Duration: 00:47:05     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
54.
Christine and Dave Galliher, August 8, 1979. Interview H-0314.
Life, Work, and the Walk-Out Strike of 1929 in Elizabethton, Tennessee, Textile Mills: Christine Galliher describes life and work in Elizabethton, Tennessee, during the late 1920s through the 1940s. She also discusses their participation in the 1929 walk-out strike at the Bermberg and Glantzstoff textile mills; Christine's attendance of the Southern Summer School for women workers; life during the Great Depression; and balancing work and family.
Interviewee: Christine Galliher, Dave Galliher    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:57:27     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
55.
Mary Price Adamson, April 19, 1976. Interview G-0001.
Connecting to Beliefs: The Importance of Family, Friends, and Work in the Life of Mary Price Adamson: Beginning with her family background and early childhood, Adamson traces the dynamics that led her to adopt her radical stance later in life. She also responds to the accusations that she had been a Communist spy and explains how the Red Scare affected her life.
Interviewee: Mary Price Adamson    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: Unknown     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 40 excerpts.
56.
Elizabeth and Courtney Siceloff, July 8, 1985. Interview F-0039.
A Quaker Couple's Lifelong Social Activism: Elizabeth and Courtney Siceloff recall their work with the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen and with the Penn School. The interview centers largely on the internal problems and external mission of the Fellowship.
Interviewee: Elizabeth Siceloff, Courtney Siceloff, Elizabeth Siceloff, Courtney Siceloff
Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 01:21:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
57.
Josephine Clement, July 13 and August 3, 1989. Interview C-0074.
Gender and Race in Durham: An African American Woman Recalls Her Career in Politics: Josephine Dobbs Clement talks about her various civic roles, including her activity as a member of the League of Women Voters, the Durham City-County Charter Commission, the Board of Education, and the Board of County Commissioners. She also discusses her efforts on behalf of social justice and her views on race, gender, and environmental issues.
Interviewee: Josephine Clement    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:46:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 16 excerpts.
58.
Vivion Lenon Brewer, October 15, 1976. Interview G-0012.
Women's Emergency Committee Activist's Role in the Little Rock Crisis: In this interview, Vivion Lenon Brewer explains how her awareness of racial disparities caused her to support school desegregation in Little Rock, Arkansas. She discusses her leadership in pushing politicians to reopen the closed public schools during the 1958-1959 Little Rock school crisis.
Interviewee: Vivion Lenon Brewer    Interviewer: Elizabeth Jacoway
Duration: 01:32:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
59.
Juanita Kreps, January 17, 1986. Interview C-0011.
Finding a Balance between Academia, Government, and Motherhood: Academic and Carter cabinet member Juanita Kreps describes her career as an economist and as an early proponent of women's rights.
Interviewee: Juanita Kreps    Interviewer: Lynn Haessly
Duration: 01:19:54     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
60.
Louise Young, February 14, 1972. Interview G-0066.
A White Teacher Describes Her Work at Historically Black Colleges: Louise Young was an educated woman from Tennessee who spent most of her adult life working to promote better race relations in the South. Young describes her years teaching at African American institutions of higher education—Paine College and the Hampton Institute—during the 1910s and 1920s; her job as the director of the Department of Home Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, where she trained students at Scarritt College in race relations; her support of women's organizations, particularly the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching; and labor activism, as exemplified by the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee.
Interviewee: Louise Young    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 03:09:02     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
61.
Alice Grogan Hardin, May 2, 1980. Interview H-0248.
Farmwork and Millwork in Greenville County, South Carolina: Alice Grogan Hardin remembers her early years in the rural Greenville County, South Carolina, on the farm and at the mill.
Interviewee: Alice Grogan Hardin    Interviewer: Allen Tullos
Duration: 00:54:27     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
62.
Emma Whitesell, July 27, 1977. Interview H-0057.
A Woman's Life as a Mill Worker: Emma Whitesell recalls a lifetime of work in North Carolina textile mills.
Interviewee: Emma Whitesell    Interviewer: Cliff Kuhn
Duration: 01:15:29     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
63.
Kathrine Robinson Everett, January 21, 1986. Interview C-0006.
A Woman Leads as Lawyer and Activist: Kathrine Robinson Everett recalls a career as a trailblazing female lawyer and women's rights activist.
Interviewee: Kathrine Robinson Everett    Interviewer: Pamela Dean
Duration: 01:25:23     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
64.
Guion Griffis Johnson, May 17, 1974. Interview G-0029-2.
Southern Sociologist Discusses Work, Family, and Marriage: Guion Griffis Johnson, a southern sociologist who received her Ph.D. in sociology from UNC-Chapel Hill in 1927, discusses the challenges she faced as she balanced career and family as a woman. Johnson describes women's changing roles in American society, and addresses her involvement in voluntary organizations, advances in birth control and abortion, and the evolving nature of marriage, divorce, and family.
Interviewee: Guion Griffis Johnson    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson, Mary Frederickson
Duration: 01:27:39     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
65.
Eunice Austin, July 2, 1980. Interview H-0107.
A Woman's Work in North Carolina's Textile and Furniture Industries: Eunice Austin remembers her life in Catawba County, North Carolina, focusing on her many years working in the textile and furniture industries.
Interviewee: Eunice Austin    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:53:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
66.
Guion Griffis Johnson, July 1, 1974. Interview G-0029-4.
Southern Sociologist Discusses Her Roles in Issues of Social Justice: Southern sociologist Guion Griffis Johnson describes her work with the Georgia Conference on Social Welfare during the 1940s and her involvement with the women's movement and civil rights activism during the 1960s and 1970s in North Carolina. She discusses strategies for effecting change, the achievements of the Georgia Conference in promoting awareness of social welfare and race-related issues, and the progress of women and African Americans in their struggle for equality.
Interviewee: Guion Griffis Johnson    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: 02:38:58     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
67.
Josephine Glenn, June 27, 1977. Interview H-0022.
Around Burlington: Josephine Glenn's Experiences in the Mills of Alamance County, North Carolina: During the course of her career, Josephine Glenn worked in several mills around Burlington, North Carolina, allowing her to compare the textile factories in Burlington and their various working environments. She covers many topics, including wartime production, the end of segregation, and the changing roles of women in the factories.
Interviewee: Josephine Glenn    Interviewer: Cliff Kuhn, Cliff Kuhn
Duration: 01:02:08     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
68.
Patricia Neal, June 6, 1989. Interview C-0068.
School Board Member Describes Process of Integration in Durham Schools: Patricia Neal settled in Durham, North Carolina, during the 1950s and became an active member of the community. Having served on the Durham County Board of Education from the late 1960s through the 1980s, Neal describes the process of integration and its impact on Durham schools and on the community.
Interviewee: Patricia Neal    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:26:42     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
69.
Phyllis Tyler, October 10, 1988. Interview C-0080.
Southern White Woman Describes Her Involvement in the Civil Rights Movement and Race Relations in Raleigh, North Carolina: Phyllis Tyler first moved to North Carolina during the 1940s in order to join the Blessed Community of Quakers in Celo. In the 1950s, she moved with her family to Raleigh, where she became increasingly involved in the civil rights movement. Throughout the interview, she emphasizes the changing nature of race relations from the 1950s into the 1980s.
Interviewee: Phyllis Tyler    Interviewer: Terri Myers
Duration: 00:47:03     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
70.
Isabella Cannon, June 27, 1989. Interview C-0062.
First Female Mayor of Raleigh Remembers Her Community Activism and Her Accomplishments in Office: Elected in 1977 at the age of 73, Isabella Cannon was the first female mayor of Raleigh, North Carolina. In this interview, Cannon describes her involvement in the United Church of Christ, her support of the civil rights movement, and her advocacy for community revitalization and development. In addition, she recalls her major accomplishments as mayor and the challenges she faced in implementing her long-range comprehensive plan for the city.
Interviewee: Isabella Cannon    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:32:30     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
71.
Junie Edna Kaylor Aaron, December 12, 1979. Interview H-0106.
Sewing for a Living in North Carolina: Junie Edna Kaylor Aaron remembers her long working life in the clothing industry in North Carolina.
Interviewee: Junie Edna Kaylor Aaron    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:31:21     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
72.
Eula and Vernon Durham, November 29, 1978. Interview H-0064.
The Lives of Mill Workers in Bynum, North Carolina: Eula Durham and her husband Vernon recall their experiences as mill workers in Bynum, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Eula Durham, Vernon Durham    Interviewer: Jim Leloudis
Duration: 01:50:43     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
73.
Evelyn Gosnell Harvell, May 27, 1980. Interview H-0250.
Remembering Thirty Years as a Weaver: Evelyn Gosnell Harvell recalls growing up on a South Carolina farm and the more than three decades she spent as a weaver in a textile mill.
Interviewee: Evelyn Gosnell Harvell    Interviewer: Allen Tullos
Duration: 00:53:21     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
74.
Kathryn Killian and Blanche Bolick, December 12, 1979. Interview H-0131.
Sisters and Glove Makers Reflect on Lives and Careers: Kathryn Killian and her sister Blanche Bolick recall their upbringing near Conover, North Carolina, and their careers making gloves.
Interviewee: Kathryn Killian, Blanche Bolick    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:00:42     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
75.
Ellen W. Gerber, February 18 and March 24, 1992. Interview C-0092.
Physical Educator Turned Lawyer Describes Women's Issues and Legal Service for the Poor in North Carolina: Originally from Brooklyn, New York, Ellen Gerber received her doctorate in physical education and taught in northern colleges before attending the School of Law at the University of North Carolina during the mid-1970s. After her graduation, she accepted a job with Legal Aid. She describes her careers in physical education and law and discusses in detail her advocacy of women's issues.
Interviewee: Ellen W. Gerber    Interviewer: Kristen L. Gislason
Duration: 02:18:49     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
76.
Adele Clark, February 28, 1964. Interview G-0014-2.
Southern Woman Describes Her Leadership Roles in the Women's Suffrage Movement: Adele Clark was a founding member of the Equal Suffrage League of Virginia and the League of Women Voters. In this interview, she describes how the suffrage movement unfolded in Virginia, discussing the successes as well as the obstacles suffragettes faced during their struggle.
Interviewee: Adele Clark    Interviewer: Winston Broadfoot
Duration: 01:47:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
77.
Patricia Long, November 14, 1996. Interview G-0215.
Lesbian Activist Describes Her Role in the Gay Liberation Movement and the Religious Community: Patricia Long became an active member of Pullen Baptist Church, known for its progressive social activism, during the late 1980s. She describes how her involvement with Pullen allowed her to come to terms with her own lesbian sexuality and details the process by which Pullen decided to sanction holy unions between gay and lesbian couples.
Interviewee: Patricia Long    Interviewer: Sherry Honeycutt
Duration: 01:01:58     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
78.
Virginia Grantham, March 6, 1985. Interview F-0017.
Southern Woman Offers Her Thoughts on the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen: Virginia Grantham discusses her thoughts on the Fellowship of Southern Churchman and her participation in it, primarily during the 1950s. In the interview, she focuses on such topics as leadership, socialism, and connections to the civil rights movement.
Interviewee: Virginia Grantham, Virginia Grantham    Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 00:24:16     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
79.
Jean Fairfax, October 15, 1983. Interview F-0013.
African American Civil Rights Activist Describes Her Work with the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen During the 1940s: Jean Fairfax first moved to the South in 1942, where she became involved with the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen for several years. Fairfax describes the goals and activities of the Fellowship, discusses the role of leadership in the Fellowship, and draws connections between her work with the Fellowship in the 1940s and her later involvement with the civil rights movement from the late 1950s on.
Interviewee: Jean Fairfax, Jean Fairfax    Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 00:52:09     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
80.
Grace Towns Hamilton, July 19, 1974. Interview G-0026.
African American Civil Rights Activist Describes Her Work with the YWCA and the Urban League: Grace Towns Hamilton was raised in Atlanta, where both of her parents were involved in community service and issues of social justice. Following family tradition, Hamilton was an active participant in the YWCA during the 1920s, and during the 1940s and 1950s she was the director for Atlanta's Urban League. She describes her work with these organizations, focusing on issues of segregation, education, voter registration, and housing.
Interviewee: Grace Towns Hamilton    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:34:37     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
81.
Margaret Skinner Parker, March 7, 1976. Interview H-0278.
Life, Labor, and World War II in Cooleemee, North Carolina: Margaret Skinner Parker recalls life in the mill town of Cooleemee, North Carolina, in the first half of the twentieth century, sharing recollections of fun and financial struggle.
Interviewee: Margaret Skinner Parker    Interviewer: W. Weldon Huske
Duration: 01:27:30     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
82.
Josephine Turner, June 7, 1976. Interview H-0235-2.
A Wealth of Ambition in Durham, North Carolina: Durham, North Carolina, resident Josephine Turner reflects on her struggle to leave behind a life of poverty.
Interviewee: Josephine Turner    Interviewer: Karen Sindelar
Duration: 01:44:16     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 16 excerpts.
83.
Mary Robertson, August 13, 1979. Interview H-0288.
Organizing Asheville: The Labor Movement in Western North Carolina: Mary Robertson offers an insider's view of the organized labor movement in western North Carolina.
Interviewee: Mary Robertson    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:35:09     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
84.
Emily S. MacLachlan, July 16, 1974. Interview G-0038.
Southern Sociologist Discusses Education, Career, and Her Mother's Life: Emily S. MacLachlan grew up in the early twentieth century in Jackson, Mississippi, in a family that advocated relatively progressive ideas about race. MacLachlan describes her mother's efforts to balance family life with social activism (specifically with the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching), her own academic endeavors, and her advocacy of civil rights and radical politics during the 1930s.
Interviewee: Emily S. MacLachlan    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:34:59     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
85.
Olive Stone, August 13, 1975. Interview G-0059-4.
Academic Woman Describes Personal and Professional Life and Her Work for Social Justice: Sociologist Olive Stone describes her work as the dean of Huntingdon College from 1929 to 1934, her doctoral work at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1934 to 1936, and her work in radical politics and for social justice during the 1930s. In addition, Stone speaks at length about her life as a single woman, both professionally and socially.
Interviewee: Olive Stone    Interviewer: Sherna Gluck
Duration: 02:08:06     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
86.
Annie Mack Barbee, May 28, 1979. Interview H-0190.
Standing Up: Annie Mack Barbee Reflects on Race and Gender in Durham's Tobacco Industry: Annie Mack Barbee describes her life as a worker in the segregated Liggett & Myers tobacco factories, and discusses how gender, class and race affected her life and the choices she made.
Interviewee: Annie Mack Barbee    Interviewer: Beverly Jones
Duration: 02:08:38     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
87.
Anne Queen, April 30, 1976. Interview G-0049-1.
From Factory Floor to Yale: A Life Dedicated to Social Justice: Anne Queen spent ten years working for the Champion Paper and Fibre Company in North Carolina before continuing her education at Berea College and Yale Divinity School during the 1940s. In this interview, she describes her life as a worker, her advocacy of social justice causes, her experiences in higher education, and her work at University of Georgia, with the Friends Service Committee, and the YWCA-YMCA at University of North Carolina.
Interviewee: Anne Queen    Interviewer: Joseph A. Herzenberg
Duration: 02:37:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
88.
Anne Queen, November 22, 1976. Interview G-0049-2.
Radicalism and the Changing Landscape of Student Politics: Anne Queen, director of the YWCA-YMCA at University of North Carolina, discusses leftist student political groups at Chapel Hill during the 1950s and 1960s and the evolution of student activism into the 1970s. Additionally, she speaks more broadly about the role of radical politics in the South and offers her thoughts on the state of national politics at the time of the interview.
Interviewee: Anne Queen    Interviewer: Joseph A. Herzenberg
Duration: 01:01:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
89.
Willie Snow Ethridge, December 15, 1975. Interview G-0024.
A Southern Woman Describes Her Writing Career, Family Life, and the Anti-Lynching Movement: Willie Snow Ethridge discusses her career as a writer in the South and her efforts to combine work with family and marriage. In addition, she describes growing up in Georgia, gender expectations in the South, and her work in the anti-lynching movement.
Interviewee: Willie Snow Ethridge    Interviewer: Lee Kessler
Duration: 01:35:15     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
90.
Evelyn Schmidt, February 9, 1999. Interview K-0137.
Class, Communication, and Community Health in Durham, North Carolina: Dr. Evelyn Schmidt discusses the connections between race, class, nationality, and health in Durham, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Evelyn Schmidt    Interviewer: Ann Kaplan
Duration: 00:59:34     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
91.
Millie Tripp, August 12, 1994. Interview K-0112.
A Single Mother's Forty Years at the White Furniture Factory: Millie Tripp describes her career at the White Furniture Factory, focusing on weathering a merger and a plant closing.
Interviewee: Millie Tripp    Interviewer: Valerie Pawlewicz
Duration: 00:55:41     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
92.
Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin, August 4, 1974. Interview G-0034.
Southern Writer, Academic, and Social Activist Discusses the YWCA, Race Relations, and Growing Up in the South: Southern writer, academic, and social activist Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin describes growing up in a family where the "Lost Cause" was heralded and her subsequent work towards promoting causes of social justice. In so doing, Lumpkin describes her work with the YWCA, her education, her career in academe, and her books The Making of a Southerner and South in Progress.
Interviewee: Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 04:14:01     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
93.
Mareda Sigmon Cobb and Carrie Sigmon Yelton, June 16 and 18, 1979. Interview H-0115.
Workers and Witnesses: How Mareda Sigmon Cobb and Carrie Sigmon Yelton Saw the Southern Cotton Mills: Mareda Sigmon Cobb and her sister Carrie Sigmon Yelton both worked long careers in North Carolina textile mills, completing the family journey from farm to factory in the early decades of the twentieth century. Here they describe their family lives both as children and parents, the many implications of the Depression, working conditions in the mills, religion, and other themes central to social and labor history. The economic and material realities of textile employment are explored in detail; each suffered a major injury on the job, neither favored unionization (though their husbands did), and neither received a pension.
Interviewee: Mareda Sigmon Cobb, Carrie Sigmon Yelton    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, Patty Dilley
Duration: 03:50:12     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 36 excerpts.
94.
Modjeska Simkins, November 15, 1974. Interview G-0056-1.
Social Justice Activist from South Carolina Describes Her Childhood, Her Work with the Interracial Commission, and Race Relations: Modjeska Simkins describes growing up in a prosperous African American family, going to school, and her thoughts on "color consciousness" during her childhood in Columbia, South Carolina. In addition, she discusses her involvement in the South Carolina Commission on Interracial Cooperation and other race organizations beginning in the 1920s, her thoughts on women's unique capabilities as leaders of social justice movements, and the nature of racial tension in the South.
Interviewee: Modjeska Simkins    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:34:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
95.
Modjeska Simkins, July 28, 1976. Interview G-0056-2.
African American Activist Describes Her Work with the NAACP and the Richland County Citizens Committee in South Carolina: African American civil rights activist Modjeska Simkins describes her upbringing in a prosperous family during the early twentieth century. She charts her work with the Tuberculosis Association, the NAACP, and the Richland County Citizens' Committee. Throughout the interview, Simkins offers telling anecdotes about racial tensions in South Carolina, the inner workings of civil rights organizations, and relationships between leaders of the movement.
Interviewee: Modjeska Simkins    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 05:45:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
96.
Gladys Avery Tillett, March 20, 1974. Interview G-0061.
North Carolina Woman Describes Her Work with the League of Women Voters, State Politics, and the National Democratic Party: Gladys Avery Tillett was an advocate for women's suffrage during the early twentieth century and a participant in both state and national politics from the 1920s into the 1950s. In this interview, she describes her education, her work with the League of Women Voters, and her experiences as a leader in the National Democratic Party.
Interviewee: Gladys Avery Tillett    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, Jacquelyn Hall, Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 02:04:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
97.
Edith Mitchell Dabbs, October 4, 1975. Interview G-0022.
A Southern Woman Advocates Social and Racial Justice in South Carolina in the Mid-Twentieth Century: South Carolinian Edith Mitchell Dabbs discusses her family history as well that of her husband's family, which owned the Rip Raps Plantation. In addition, she describes the work she and her husband, James McBride Dabbs, did in advocating for racial justice during the 1940s and 1950s, their evolving views about race and race relations, and her involvement with the United Church Women.
Interviewee: Edith Mitchell Dabbs    Interviewer: Elizabeth Jacoway Burns
Duration: 04:12:26     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 14 excerpts.
98.
Elva Templeton, January 24, 1976. Interview K-0188.
Childhood in Segregated Cary, North Carolina: Elva Templeton remembers her childhood in historic Cary, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Elva Templeton    Interviewer: Anne Kratzer
Duration: 01:01:02     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
99.
Florence Dillahunt, May 31, 2001. Interview K-0580.
A North Carolina Tobacco Farmer Describes the Impact of Hurricane Floyd: Florence Dillahunt describes growing up on a small tobacco farm near Grifton, North Carolina, during the 1930s and 1940s. Dillahunt's family were victims of the extensive flooding that Hurricane Floyd brought to eastern North Carolina in 1999. She describes the devastating impact on their farm and their personal lives.
Interviewee: Florence Dillahunt    Interviewer: Leda Hartman
Duration: 00:58:02     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
100.
Edith Warren, August 28, 2002. Interview K-0601.
Facing Flooding: Pitt County after Hurricane Floyd: State representative Edith Warren describes the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd in Pitt County, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Edith Warren    Interviewer: Leda Hartman
Duration: 01:07:08     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
101.
Nelle Morton, June 29, 1983. Interview F-0034.
A Woman Leads the Churchmen: An Interview with the Former General Secretary of the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen: Nelle Morton served as the general secretary of the Fellowship of Southern Churchmen from 1944 to 1950. In this interview, she describes her perception of the leaders of the Fellowship and the organization's aims and strategies in advocating for various social justice causes, including racial integration and labor rights. In addition, she describes her leadership of a male-dominated organization and how her work with the Fellowship raised her awareness of the need for women's liberation as well.
Interviewee: Nelle Morton    Interviewer: Dallas A. Blanchard
Duration: 03:41:16     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
102.
Margaret Anne O'Connor, July 1, 1987. Interview L-0031.
Discovering Women's Studies: Margaret O'Connor and Her Path into Feminism: English professor Margaret O'Connor discusses the formation of the women's studies department at UNC-Chapel Hill, as well as some of the administrative and political issues she dealt with after its inception.
Interviewee: Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor,
Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor,
Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor,
Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor,
Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor, Margaret Anne O'Connor,
Margaret Anne O'Connor
Interviewer: Pamela Dean
Duration: 01:38:15     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
103.
William C. Friday, December 18, 1990. Interview L-0049.
University of North Carolina President William C. Friday Discusses his Professional Relationship with Anne Queen: Former president of the University of North Carolina, William C. Friday, describes his working relationship with Anne Queen, who was director of the Campus Y from the late 1950s into the 1970s. Friday discusses Queen's relationship with students and her leadership qualities.
Interviewee: William C. Friday    Interviewer: Cindy Cheatham
Duration: 00:41:55     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
104.
Ruth Dial Woods, June 12, 1992. Interview L-0078.
Lumbee Woman Describes Her Work in the Civil Rights and Women's Liberation Movements and Her Role on the University of North Carolina Board of Governors: Ruth Dial Woods describes growing up as a Lumbee Indian in Robeson County, North Carolina, in the 1930s and 1940s. During the 1960s, Woods participated in the civil rights and women's liberation movements. In 1985, she was appointed to the University of North Carolina Board of Governors, where she worked to promote equality for minority students.
Interviewee: Ruth Dial Woods    Interviewer: Anne Mitchell Coe, Laura Moore
Duration: 01:44:23     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
105.
Grace Aycock, March 28, 1990. Interview L-0037.
Wife of Former University of North Carolina Chancellor Describes Her Duties: Grace Aycock briefly describes her childhood and her education in North Carolina during the 1920s and 1930s. Most of the interview is dedicated to a discussion of Aycock's life with her husband, William Aycock, chancellor of the University of North Carolina (1957-1964). She also discusses her husband's decision to return to teaching, her pursuit of a master's degree in social work, and her battle with multiple sclerosis.
Interviewee: Grace Aycock    Interviewer: Frances A. Weaver
Duration: 01:29:53     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
106.
Terry Sanford, December 18, 1990. Interview L-0050.
Terry Sanford Discusses Civil Rights, Higher Education, and the Leadership of Anne Queen at the University of North Carolina: Former governor of North Carolina Terry Sanford lauds the leadership of Anne Queen, director of the YMCA/YWCA at the University of North Carolina. In addition, Sanford discusses his advocacy of the civil rights movement and argues that UNC was a particularly powerful force for social change during the mid-twentieth century.
Interviewee: Terry Sanford    Interviewer: Cindy Cheatham
Duration: 00:30:41     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 3 excerpts.
107.
MaVynee Betsch, November 22, 2002. Interview R-0301.
"The Straight Line, It's Like a Disease": An Unconventional Woman Remembers Segregated Jacksonville, Florida: Environmentalist MaVynee Betsch remembers her childhood in an African American neighborhood in Jacksonville, Florida, and her experiences with segregation and development.
Interviewee: MaVynee Betsch    Interviewer: Kieran Taylor
Duration: 00:56:48     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
108.
Jane Squires, September 21, 2002. Interview R-0192.
A Woman in the Warehouse: Obstacles and Opportunities for a Female Tobacco Auctioneer: Jane Squires describes building a career as a tobacco auctioneer, a male-dominated profession.
Interviewee: Jane Squires    Interviewer: William Mansfield
Duration: 01:06:01     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
109.
Laura B. Waddell, August 6, 2002. Interview R-0175.
A Seamstress in Segregated Savannah: Laura Waddell describes her successful career as a tailor as well as her civic activities in Savannah, Georgia.
Interviewee: Laura B. Waddell    Interviewer: Kieran Taylor
Duration: 01:17:02     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
110.
Lemuel Delany, July 15, 2005. Interview R-0346.
Upward Mobility: From Raleigh to New York: Lemuel Delany grew up in segregated Raleigh, North Carolina, during the 1920s and 1930s before moving to Harlem in New York City. In this interview, Delany discusses race relations in the South and in the North, offers his reaction to his aunts' book Having Our Say, outlines his family's accomplishments, and explains his disapproval of some of the actions of the NAACP and his disappointment in the impact of desegregation on African American institutions.
Interviewee: Lemuel Delany    Interviewer: Kimberly Hill
Duration: 01:33:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
111.
Arthur Raper, January 30, 1974. Interview B-0009-2.
Director of the Commission on Interracial Cooperation Describes His Perception of Jessie Daniel Ames and the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching: Southern sociologist and civil rights activist Arthur Raper discusses his interactions with Jessie Daniel Ames and the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching during his tenure as the research director of the Commission on Interracial Cooperation from 1926 to 1939. Raper describes Ames as an effective but contentious leader.
Interviewee: Arthur Raper    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:04:21     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
112.
Eva Clayton, July 18, 1989. Interview C-0084.
Building Progress: A Black Woman's Effort to Transform Warren County, North Carolina: Activist and politician Eva Clayton describes her years of service in and out of politics in Warren County, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Eva Clayton    Interviewer: Kathryn Nasstrom
Duration: 01:03:58     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
113.
Fran Jackson, March 23, 2001. Interview K-0208.
One Student's Reaction to the Integration of Chapel Hill Schools: Fran Jackson discusses her reaction to the integration of Chapel Hill High School.
Interviewee: Fran Jackson    Interviewer: Christa Broadnax
Duration: 00:55:04     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
114.
Barbara Lorie, February 26, 2001. Interview K-0211.
A White Teacher's Experiences in Desegregated North Carolina Schools: Barbara Lorie describes her experiences and teaching philosophy as a teacher at newly integrated, racially charged schools in North Carolina.
Interviewee: Barbara Lorie    Interviewer: Melissa Froemming
Duration: 01:15:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 9 excerpts.
115.
Daniel H. Pollitt, November 19, 1990. Interview L-0048.
UNC Law Professor Describes Gender and Racial Dynamics at UNC from the 1950s through the 1970s: Daniel Pollitt describes his admiration for University of North Carolina Campus Y director, Anne Queen. He discusses his and Queen's engagement in social justice movements and the city of Chapel Hill's reaction to student political engagement.
Interviewee: Daniel H. Pollitt    Interviewer: Cindy Cheatham
Duration: 01:13:00     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
116.
Margaret Kennedy Goodwin, September 26, 1997. Interview R-0113.
African American Woman Describes Life as a Single Working Mother in Mid-Twentieth-Century Durham, North Carolina: Margaret Kennedy Goodwin grew up in Durham, North Carolina, during the 1920s and 1930s. In this interview, she describes a thriving African American community in Durham, one that she views as having suffered at the hands of urban renewal during the 1970s and 1980s. In addition, she describes her educational aspirations and her career as a technician in the radiology laboratory at Durham's Lincoln Hospital.
Interviewee: Margaret Kennedy Goodwin    Interviewer: Angela Hornsby
Duration: 01:28:56     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
117.
Ethelene McCabe Allen, May 21, 2006. Interview C-0314.
Change and Constancy: Tenant Farming and Family Connections in Rural North Carolina: The daughter of tenant farmers during the 1930s and 1940s, Ethelene McCabe Allen reflects on her family history in this interview, paying particular attention to her maternal and paternal grandparents, her parents' childhood experiences, and her own relationship with extended family during her childhood in North Carolina.
Interviewee: Ethelene McCabe Allen    Interviewer: Barbara C. Allen
Duration: 01:01:58     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
118.
Louise Pointer Morton, December 12, 1994. Interview Q-0067.
Growing Up in Rural Granville County, North Carolina, in the Early Twentieth Century: Louise Pointer Morton describes life in rural Granville County, North Carolina, during the early twentieth century. In addition to describing social gatherings and living conditions, Morton speaks at length about her formerly enslaved grandmother's role in the founding of the Jonathon (Johnson) Creek Church, alluding to the centrality of religion as a preeminent social institution within southern African American communities.
Interviewee: Louise Pointer Morton    Interviewer: Eddie McCoy
Duration: 00:47:42     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
119.
Serena Henderson Parker, April 13, 1995. Interview Q-0073.
"Good Eating and Everything in the World You Wanted": Growing Up in Rural North Carolina: Serena Henderson Parker, born in 1923, remembers the rural North Carolina of her childhood.
Interviewee: Serena Henderson Parker    Interviewer: Eddie McCoy
Duration: 00:46:51     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
120.
Icy Norman, April 6 and 30, 1979. Interview H-0036.
"I Give the Best Part of My Life": Pride and Regret in the Life of a Textile Mill Worker: Icy Norman recalls her long working life, most of which was spent at a textile mill in Burlington, North Carolina.
Interviewee: Icy Norman    Interviewer: Mary Murphy
Duration: 04:05:23     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 17 excerpts.
121.
Barbara Greenlief, April 27, 1996. Interview R-0020.
Daughter of Singer Lily May Ledford Recalls Her Mother's Life, Career, and Struggles with Southern Gender Ideals: The daughter of southern singer Lily May Ledford, Barbara Greenlief, recalls the life and career of her mother. Focusing primarily on her mother's years spent performing with the Coon Creek Girls, Greenlief describes her mother's working relationship with her manager, John Lair, and the ways in which she struggled to reconcile her desire for independence with her adherence to gender ideals of the day.
Interviewee: Barbara Greenlief    Interviewer: Lisa Yarger
Duration: 02:03:20     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
122.
Margaret Edwards, January 20, 2002. Interview R-0157.
African American Woman From North Carolina Discusses Her Life as a Mormon: Margaret Edwards grew up in a large African American sharecropping family in Ayden, North Carolina, during the 1950s and 1960s. She eventually settled in the Raleigh area. Following her experiences with the Baptist and Pentecostal Holiness churches, she converted to Mormonism in 1998. In this interview, she discusses her role within the Mormon Church as an African American woman; the intersections between race, gender, and religion; and the attitude of other denominations toward Mormonism.
Interviewee: Margaret Edwards    Interviewer: Barbara Copeland
Duration: 01:26:53     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
123.
Adetola Hassan, December 16, 2001. Interview R-0160.
Young Mormon Woman Discusses the Mormon Church in the South: Adetola Hassan, a British citizen of Nigerian descent, was a freshman student at Duke University at the time of this interview in 2001. In the interview, she discusses her Mormon faith, focusing on tensions surrounding Mormonism in the South as well as issues related to gender and race within the church.
Interviewee: Adetola Hassan    Interviewer: Barbara Copeland
Duration: 01:53:36     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
124.
Lillian Taylor Lyons, September 11, 1994. Interview Q-0094.
Race Relations in "Forward-Looking" Oxford, North Carolina, During the Early Twentieth Century: Born and raised in Oxford, North Carolina, in the early twentieth century, Lillian Taylor Lyons discusses her family history, her education, and her career as a teacher. Lyons also speaks at length about race relations in Oxford, arguing that Oxford was especially "forward-looking" in comparison to other southern communities.
Interviewee: Lillian Taylor Lyons    Interviewer: Eddie McCoy
Duration: 01:44:09     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
125.
Guion Griffis Johnson, May 28, 1974. Interview G-0029-3.
A Southern Sociologist Describes Her Education and Her Work in Race Relations: Renowned southern sociologist Guion Griffis Johnson discusses her education, her work with the Institute for Research in Social Sciences, her participation in the Carnegie-Myrdal Study of the Negro in America, and the challenges of being a woman academic during the 1920s and 1930s. Throughout the interview, she emphasizes the challenges and experiences of academics with progressive views of race and gender during that era.
Interviewee: Guion Griffis Johnson    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: 02:04:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
126.
Vesta and Sam Finley, July 22, 1975. Interview H-0267.
Union Activists Recall the 1929 Marion Strike: Sam and Vesta Finley describe their roles in the North Carolina factory strike that led to the "Marion Massacre."
Interviewee: Vesta Finley, Sam Finley    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: Unknown     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 31 excerpts.
127.
James and Nannie Pharis, December 5, 1978; January 8 and 30, 1979. Interview H-0039.
Southern Woman Remembers Work, Family Life, and Foodways in a Mill Town: James and Nannie Pharis both began working in the cotton mills of Spray, North Carolina, as children during the turn of the twentieth century. In this interview, which focuses primarily on Nannie Pharis, they discuss working conditions, family life, community gatherings, and foodways in a southern community that merged industrial and agricultural lifestyles.
Interviewee: James Pharis, Nannie Pharis    Interviewer: Allen Tullos
Duration: 02:49:47     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 12 excerpts.
128.
Ella Baker, September 4, 1974. Interview G-0007.
Ella Baker Describes Her Role in the Formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee: Ella Baker was an instrumental figure in the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). In this interview, she offers a candid analysis of the formation of those organizations and an insider's perspective on the role of and interactions between various civil rights leaders, including Martin Luther King Jr.
Interviewee: Ella Baker    Interviewer: Eugene Walker
Duration: 03:34:21     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
129.
Patience Dadzie, October 21, 2001. Interview R-0156.
An African Immigrant Discusses Her Role in the Mormon Church in the American South: Patience Dadzie immigrated to the United States of America from Ghana in 1991. In this interview, she describes her life in Ghana, her conversion to Mormonism, and her thoughts on practicing Mormonism in the American South in the 1990s.
Interviewee: Patience Dadzie    Interviewer: Barbara Copeland
Duration: 01:27:24     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
130.
Nell Putnam Sigmon, December 13, 1979. Interview H-0143.
"I Was a Good Hand": Glove Maker Nell Putnam Sigmon Remembers Her Life: In this 1979 interview, Nell Putnam Sigmon describes her upbringing in a large family, her decision at age eighteen to take a job sewing women's gloves, her work in the mill, and her experiences as wife and mother of two children.
Interviewee: Nell Putnam Sigmon    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall
Duration: 01:50:32     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 20 excerpts.
131.
Ethelene McCabe Allen, May 21, 2006. Interview C-0316.
Childhood on a North Carolina Farm: Born in 1934 to tenant farmers in North Carolina, Ethelene McCabe Allen focuses on describing family dynamics that shaped her childhood, paying particular attention to her parents' relationship with each other and with their children.
Interviewee: Ethelene McCabe Allen    Interviewer: Barbara C. Allen
Duration: 01:50:14     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 8 excerpts.
132.
Mary Turner Lane, September 9 and 16, 1986; May 21, 1987; October 1 and 28, 1987. Interview L-0039.
Fighting for a Place: Mary Turner Lane and the Growth of Women's Studies: Mary Turner Lane was the first director of the women's studies program at the University of North Carolina. In this interview, she discusses the beginnings and the evolution of the women's studies program at UNC.
Interviewee: Mary Turner Lane    Interviewer: Pamela Dean
Duration: 05:09:44     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 33 excerpts.
133.
Mildred Price Coy, April 26, 1976. Interview G-0020.
Moving to the Left: Mildred Price Coy's Civil Rights Journey: Mildred Price Coy discusses the development of her egalitarian ideals, her involvement in various justice movements during the twentieth century, and the societal changes she witnessed.
Interviewee: Mildred Price Coy    Interviewer: Mary Frederickson
Duration: Unknown     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 20 excerpts.
134.
Jessie Streater, November 10, 2001. Interview R-0165.
"This Must Be What I Am Looking For": An African American on the Mormon Church: Jessie Streater describes Mormon belief and practice and shares her thoughts on the place of African Americans in the Mormon religion.
Interviewee: Jessie Streater    Interviewer: Barbara Copeland
Duration: 01:14:10     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
135.
Kanwal Rahman, July 15, 1999. Interview K-0817.
"I Don't Feel as American as Them": A Bangladeshi Woman's Enduring Connection to Home: Kanwal Rahman, who arrived in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, from Bangladesh in 1991 to study public health, describes her enduring connection to her homeland and her struggle to adjust to the American way of life.
Interviewee: Kanwal Rahman    Interviewer: Rajika Bhandari
Duration: 00:44:17     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
136.
Ella Baker, April 19, 1977. Interview G-0008.
Leading Others into Light: Ella Baker and the Growth of the Civil Rights Movement: Civil rights activist and Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) mentor Ella Josephine Baker outlines her family history, traces her growing radical tendencies, and explains the catalysts that pushed her into public activism. In this interview she discusses her work not only with SNCC, but also with the Workers' Education Project, the Cooperative League, and the NAACP.
Interviewee: Ella Baker    Interviewer: Sue Thrasher
Duration: 03:09:41     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 21 excerpts.
137.
Pauli Murray, February 13, 1976. Interview G-0044.
A Legal Activist Discusses Her Work in the Civil Rights and Women's Liberation Movements: Pauli Murray was a prominent legal activist within the civil rights and women's liberation movements. In this interview, she discusses her childhood and her education, the events leading up to her decision to pursue a career in law, the evolution of her career, her decision to enter the seminary, and her thoughts on civil rights and women's liberation.
Interviewee: Pauli Murray    Interviewer: Genna Rae McNeil
Duration: 05:18:41     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
138.
Gladys Harris, August 8, 1979. Interview H-0124.
Hosiery Mill Worker Describes Life and Work in Gastonia, North Carolina: Gladys Harris grew up in a farming family during the 1910s and 1920s. In 1940, she went to work as an inspector and as a sewer in Gastonia, North Carolina, hosiery mills. Because her husband was unable to work, Harris was the chief earner for her family. She describes her experiences at work over the course of several decades.
Interviewee: Gladys Harris    Interviewer: Patty Dilley
Duration: 01:10:01     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 4 excerpts.
139.
Anson Dorrance, June 11, 1991. Interview L-0054.
"Collective Fury": Winning and Womanhood on the Carolina Women's Soccer Team: University of North Carolina women's soccer coach Anson Dorrance reflects on his teams' remarkable successes and his career as a male coach of a women's team.
Interviewee: Anson Dorrance    Interviewer: Mary Jo Festle
Duration: 01:36:03     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 13 excerpts.
140.
Sharon Rose Powell, June 20, 1989. Interview L-0041.
Challenges to In Loco Parentis Rules for Women at UNC in the Mid-1960s: Sharon Rose Powell attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the mid-1960s, when the university began to admit women students in greater numbers. In this interview, she vividly recalls her experiences at UNC, focusing primarily on the in loco parentis rules that gave the university permission to act as surrogate parents and her own role in challenging and removing many of those rules.
Interviewee: Sharon Rose Powell    Interviewer: Pamela Dean
Duration: 02:11:51     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 5 excerpts.
141.
Suzanne Post, June 23, 2006. Interview U-0178.
Suzanne Post and the Fight for Civil Rights in Louisville, Kentucky: Civil rights activist Suzanne Post speaks about what motivated her commitment to social justice. Though she is best known for her work to overcome race-based segregated education in Louisville and to launch Louisville's Metropolitan Housing Coalition, Post insists that her most important work centered on women's rights.
Interviewee: Suzanne Post    Interviewer: Sarah Thuesen
Duration: 01:47:27     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 16 excerpts.
142.
Angela Brightfeather, January 24, 2002. Interview K-0841.
A Discussion of Transgender Identity and its Relationship to the GLBT Community in North Carolina: Before moving to North Carolina in 1999, Angela Brightfeather spent most of her life in Syracuse, New York, where she was actively involved in the transgender community. In this interview, Brightfeather describes her own transgender experience, variations in transgenderism, the history of transgender people, the relationship of transgender people to the GLBT community, and her activist work for transgender rights in North Carolina.
Interviewee: Angela Brightfeather    Interviewer: Chris McGinnis
Duration: 02:30:40     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
143.
Gemma Ziegler, June 22, 2006. Interview U-0181.
A Louisville Nurse Discusses Her Role in Efforts to Organize Nurses: During the mid-1970s, Gemma Ziegler became a nurse in Louisville, Kentucky, and joined the campaign to organize nurses. In this interview, she discusses her experiences as a nurse; her work as an organizer for We're Involved in Nursing (WIN); her role in the founding of the Nurses Professional Organization (NPO); and the NPO's various activities from the late 1980s into the early twenty-first century.
Interviewee: Gemma Ziegler    Interviewer: Sarah Thuesen
Duration: 01:58:53     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.
144.
Kay Tillow, June 23, 2006. Interview U-0180.
Labor Activist Discusses Her Work with Local 1199, the Machinists, and the NPO: Kay Tillow discusses her career as a labor activist, describing her early work in social justice movements of the 1960s and with Local 1199 in Pennsylvania during the 1970s and 1980s. In the late 1980s, Tillow returned to her home state of Kentucky, where she worked closely with the Nurses Professional Organization (NPO) as a representative of the Association of Machinists, who sponsored the NPO in their initial effort to organize Louisville nurses. She continued her work with the NPO towards achieving bargaining power into the early twenty-first century.
Interviewee: Kay Tillow    Interviewer: Sarah Thuesen
Duration: 02:03:33     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 6 excerpts.
145.
Viola Turner, April 17, 1979. Interview C-0016.
Intersections of Race, Class, and Gender at North Carolina Mutual: In this second part of an extensive two-part interview series, Viola Turner discusses race relations in Durham and her experiences working for North Carolina Mutual. Turner offers vivid and detailed anecdotes that reveal the intricate social and professional network of Durham, primarily in the 1920s and 1930s.
Interviewee: Viola Turner    Interviewer: Walter Weare
Duration: 06:28:10     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 15 excerpts.
146.
Thelma Stevens, February 13, 1972. Interview G-0058.
Building Bridges: A White Southerner's Devotion to Improving Race Relations: Thelma Stevens was the director of the Bethlehem Center in Augusta, Georgia, and the Superintendent of Christian Social Relations of the Women's Missionary Council for the Methodist Episcopal Church. In this interview, she describes her childhood in rural Mississippi, her education, and her work with the Methodist Church, all in relationship to her lifelong devotion to improving race relations in the South.
Interviewee: Thelma Stevens    Interviewer: Jacquelyn Hall, Bob Hall
Duration: Unknown     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 11 excerpts.
147.
Betty and Lloyd Davidson, February 2 and 15, 1979. Interview H-0019.
Husband and Wife Describe Their Lives as Weavers in Burlington, North Carolina: Lloyd and Betty Parker Davidson grew up in Danville, Virginia, during the 1910s and 1920s. After establishing themselves as weavers in Danville, they moved to Burlington, North Carolina, in 1932 to work at the Plaid Mill. In this interview, they describe their experiences as weavers, focusing especially on working conditions in the 1930s and 1940s.
Interviewee: Betty Davidson, Lloyd Davidson    Interviewer: Allen Tullos
Duration: 01:59:13     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 10 excerpts.
148.
Sandra Kay Yow, June 22, 2005. Interview G-0244.
Pioneering Basketball Coach Discusses Women's Athletics in North Carolina: Kay Yow, a pioneering women's basketball coach, discusses her childhood in Gibsonville, North Carolina, and her early experiences playing basketball. She discusses her experiences as a coach, her philosophy of leadership, and the challenges facing women's athletics.
Interviewee: Sandra Kay Yow    Interviewer: Pamela Grundy
Duration: 01:37:19     Annotated Excerpts: Listen to and read all 7 excerpts.