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Title: "Farewell Address to Prof. Hooper," Poem by George M. Horton, September 1837; Raleigh Register and North-Carolina Gazette, October 9, 1837, 4: Electronic Edition.
Author: Horton, George Moses, 1798?-ca. 1880
Editor: Erika Lindemann
Funding from the State Library of North Carolina supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Erika Lindemann
Images scanned by Mara E. Dabrishus
Text encoded by Sarah Ficke
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 8K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-03-15, Sarah Ficke finished TEI/XML encoding.
Part of a series:
This transcribed document is part of a digital collection, titled True and Candid Compositions: The Lives and Writings of Antebellum Students in North Carolina
written by Lindemann, Erika
Source(s):
Title of article: "Farewell Address to Prof. Hooper," Poem by George M. Horton, September 1837:
Title of serial: Raleigh Register & North-Carolina Gazette, October 9, 1837, 4
Author: George M. Horton
Description: 1 pages, 1 page images
Note: Call number VC071 R16r (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Topics covered:
Education/UNC Faculty, Staff, and Servants
Writings by Non-Students
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
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Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
Letters, words and passages marked as deleted or added in originals have been encoded accordingly.
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All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
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Indentation in lines has not been preserved.

For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see Dr. Erika Lindemann's explanation under the section Editorial Practices.

Document Summary

Horton's poem expresses regret at Prof. William Hooper's departure from the University and wishes him well in his new position at the Furman Institute in South Carolina.
"Farewell Address to Prof. Hooper," Poem by George M. Horton , September 1837; Raleigh Register and North-Carolina Gazette, October 9, 1837, 41




Horton, George Moses, 1798?-ca. 1880



Page 1
POETRY.
"LIKE ORIENT PEARLS AT RANDOM STRUNG."
FOR THE REGISTER.
Farewell Address to Prof. Hooper ,
BY GEORGE HORTON , THE BLACK POET.
Farewell, if thou hence wil't depart,
And leave us, dull brooding behind,
The thought of thy flight, is a veil to each heart,
And clogs all the wheels of the mind.
If thy race in this College is o'er,
And duty forbids thy delay,
Farewell! but thy conduct we still shall adore,
When fortune shall waft thee away.
We still shall thy powers proclaim,
And thy deeds we will ever admire;
Here, no mortal tongue shall extinguish thy fame
But kindle its taper, still higher.
The Sun of our language must set,
Gladly to rise on some distant shore;
He leaves us in gloom, with tears of regret,
And will illumine this College no more!
Then honor'd Professor , farewell!
May the joys of life be thy lot;
And though grief may our sad bosoms swell,
Thy virtues shall ne'er be forgot.
Chapel Hill, N. C. Sept. 1837.

Endnotes:

1. Raleigh Register and North-Carolina Gazette, October 9, 1837, p. 4, NCC.