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Title: Letter from Alexander J. Davis to David L. Swain, August 25, 1845: Electronic Edition.
Author: Davis, Alexander Jackson, 1803-1892
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Brian Dietz
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 11K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-07-07, Brian Dietz finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: University of North Carolina Papers (#40005), University Archives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from Alexander J. Davis to David L. Swain, August 25, 1845
Author: Alex J. Davis
Description: 3 pages, 3 page images
Note: Call number 40005 (University Archives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
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Letter from Alexander J. Davis to David L. Swain , August 25, 1845
Davis, Alexander Jackson, 1803-1892



Page 1
N. Y. Aug. 25 '45

Dear Sir:

I received yours of the 8th, with the enclosed to Mr. Donaldson, and have delayed answer, until I could look around and consult one or two friends upon the subject of the gardener. From the first, I have had a person in view, who studied with Mr. Downing, and who now lives at Cincinnatti, Mr. Eliott, brother of H. H. Eliott of our city, and formerly resident near Mr. Downing, at Fishkill, N.Y. opposite Newburgh. Mr. Eliott is a young man of education, and an active spirit — fond of his art, and I think destined to take a high rank as a landscape Gardener. His manners, general intelligence, and love of science in his art, make him the very man for Chapel Hill, and I have little doubt but that a very moderate remuneration would content him for a time, until he shall have become known, and sought after.

Page 2
His connection with your university would be a stepping stone to his deserts, and would probably lead to some practice in your state — both in the line of Agriculturalist and as Landscape Gardener, and serve as an inducement to him to leave Ohio, (where I believe he is well contented with his prospects) for at least a portion of the year, to reside in N.C. — Thus extending his field of practice, and enabling him to acquire a more intimate knowledge of the varieties of soil and climate. I have seen Mr. Eliotts' brother here, and as soon as we can hear from Cincinnatti I will write you again.



Page 3
With respect to settlements, or fractures in your new walls, it is a subject with which I have not much experience, — as how to reform them, that is, practically, since I have never had occasion to exercise any theory upon such matters. Most masons would prefer to rebuild the entire wall, but a truly scientific one would like to exercise his ingenuity in the most economical way! (The true economy is the question!) I think, unless the settlement is a considerable one and the adjoining wall evidently feeling for its neighbor, I would endeavor to join a portion of new wall, and allow for the settlement in seasoning, rather than rebuild.

Yours, respectfully and truly

Alex J. Davis



N. York, July 12, 1845
Received from Chas. Manly the sum of one hundred dollars: remuneration for services as Architect to the University, Chapel Hill, N.C. to said date, as above.

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