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Title: Report of the Committee on the Extension of the College Buildings, [1857]: Electronic Edition.
Author: University of North Carolina (1793-1962). Board of Trustees
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Brian Dietz
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 16K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-07-11, Brian Dietz finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: University of North Carolina Papers (#40005), University Archives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Report of the Committee on the Extension of the College Buildings, [1857]
Author: The Committee
Description: 5 pages, 5 page images
Note: Call number 40005 (University Archives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
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Report of the Committee on the Extension of the College Buildings, [1857]
University of North Carolina (1793-1962). Board of Trustees



Page 1
The Committee on Extension of the College Buildings reports
(1.) That it does not regard the increase of dormitories as of prime necessity at present. Our wants are rather of rooms for public purposes. Notwithstanding the large number of Students this last year, rooms were always vacant in the present buildings, so that if new ones were erected, in all probability, they would be filled at the expense of those we now have. It may not be desirable to invite more pupils here now, and if the number lessens, the competition for tenants by those who have built dormitories in the village will render the necessity for rooms from the University smaller than it is now.
(2.) As to the plans presented for the increase in number and capacity of our public rooms, the Committee will call attention to them and then frankly acknowledge that it has no very decided preference for one over another. The decisive reasons in the case are not before us now.
Mr Davis's plans for alterations in the third story of the South Building are before you in detail, and

Page 2
we believe, they have not met with the approval of the Faculty after a long continued consideration. His changes in the South Building require from us so large an amount of our present available space while they are making, that it will be well nigh impossible to execute them. Besides the building is an old one, and its walls are in such a state as render the practicability of the changes proposed at least very doubtful. Still it must be admitted that if adopted they will add much to the architectural beauty of the buildings we have. So also for his suggestions concerning the Chapel , they will render it a handsome building, although odd. The additional room they afford is desirable, still it is further desirable that as much of the capacity of the house as possible be available for seating our audiences. Another plan proposed is to remove the porch now on the south to the north side of the Chapel and to have two doors at its ends. A rostrum may then be put between the doors, and the seats be arranged continuously in a semicircular form and rise as they recede from the speakers position. A gallery may be on three sides of the house — viz. on the south, east and west. It is very doubtful whether the roof of the Chapel will sustain a dome as is recommended by Mr Davis .
It has also been suggested that an additional building

Page 3
be erected and devoted to recitation rooms and rooms for the Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies. Such a building might add eight or twelve public rooms to those we now have, and have on it a tower for the bell.
Another plan proposed is to erect a building of a T shape — the head of the T being three stories and its stem two stories high. The stem of the T is to be devoted to a new Chapel — the first of its head to recitation rooms, and the second and third stories to rooms for the Societies. The erection of this building will enable us to alter the present Chapel so as to afford ample accommodations to the Chemical department in both of its forms, and to the Mineralogical and Geological departments.
As to the position for this new building, it may not be within the province of the Committee to select one. It has been suggested to place it on a line with the South Building and the Library &c, either at its west or at its east end. Then if another building ever be needed it can be put parallel to the East & West buildings and so the symmetry of our present order be maintained. Another good position for it would be at the end of the Avenue where the Old Steward's Hall stood. There it would have an imposing aspect to all who enter the Campus at its present gate. Another place proper for this building is between the South Building and the Main Street of

Page 4
the village so as to make a quadrangle with the present buildings. Another place has been suggested as suitable for this building, on the high ground between the Old Chapel & Dr Mitchell's garden. It has been also suggested that the accommodations proposed illegible be distributed between two buildings, one to be on the east side of the east building , and the other on the west side of the west building , and both to front north.
As to the cost of these improvements, it is most likely that they will amount to $30,000 and one reason for our refraining from deciding as to their respective merits is our ignorance as to the amount that the Trustees can expend at present for such purposes. The plans for a building for Recitation and Society rooms is liable to the objections that it furnishes rather more teaching room than we are ever likely to need; that we will find difficulty in rendering the present Society rooms useful for any other than their present purpose; and its architectural merits are not of a high order. To the plan for a T building some of these objections are also applicable, and besides, it is doubtful whether the Chapel can secure enough light for the objects of such a room.
Another plan is to lengthen the east and West buildings so as to give more space to the Society rooms there. These rooms are now too small, and the access to them is

Page 5
very inconvenient. These buildings might have about 30 feet added to each, and so contain rooms that will be half as long again as wide (viz. 37 X 55) and afford access to them in porches at the northern ends. The East building also might afford recitation rooms in its basement at the northern end, under the addition herein suggested. This plan appears to be entirely feasible. It will involve less expense than either of the other schemes. It will give ample space to the Societies, and if ever they should leave their present positions their rooms will be more available for other purposes then they are now, both by reason of their form, and the mode of obtaining entrance to them.
Another plan is to leave the East & West buildings of their present length, but to obtain access to the Society rooms through the second, or through the second and third stories of the old parts of those buildings. This plan will enlarge the available space of the Society rooms, and it can be executed at less cost than any one of the plans yet proposed.
As to the bell, it is suggested that a tower be built for it from the ground and attached to the Old Chapel . In this position its sound will less confined by surrounding buildings than in its old place, a point of some moment when our Students are so widely scattered. It may also be more removed from the hands of idle boys.

Submitted by the Committee

E. Mitchell

[ChM. ;]

[Charles Phillips ;]

[M. Fetter ]