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Title: Excerpts from Board of Trustees Minutes, December 4, 1795 [Containing the "Plan of the Preparatory School" and the "Plan of Education Under the Professorships of the University"]: Electronic Edition.
Author: University of North Carolina (1793-1962). Board of Trustees
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text scanned (OCR) by Brian Dietz
Images scanned by Brian Dietz
Text encoded by Brian Dietz
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 22K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-12-19, Brian Dietz finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Board of Trustees of the University of North Carolina Records (#40001), University Archives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Excerpts from Board of Trustees Minutes, December 4, 1795 [Containing the "Plan of the Preparatory School" and the "Plan of Education Under the Professorships of the University"]
Author: The Board
Description: 7 pages, 7 page images
Note: Call number 40001 (University Archives, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
Text transcription of this document was produced by OCR (optical character recognition) from R. D. W. Connor's A Documentary History of the University of North Carolina 1776-1799 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1953), vol. 1: 451-455. Used by permission of the publisher (www.uncpress.unc.edu).
Page images were made from the original manuscript held in University Archives/Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Connor's transcription was compared against the original document and in the case of any discrepancy we have been faithful to the original.
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For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Excerpts from Board of Trustees Minutes, December 4, 1795 [Containing the "Plan of the Preparatory School" and the "Plan of Education Under the Professorships of the University"]
University of North Carolina (1793-1962). Board of Trustees



Page 202
. . .
The Committee appointed to prepare and digest a plan of Education for the University Reported the following; which was received and concurred

Page 203
with, to Wit.
The Students of the Institution to be divided into a Preparatory School, and the Professorships of the University.

Plan of the Preparatory School.

The English Language to be taught Grammatically on the plan of Webster's & South's Grammars.
Writing in a neat and correct manner.
Arithmetic, the four first rules with the Rule of Three.
English Additional exercises.
Reading and pronouncing select passages from the present English Authors.
Copying in a fair and correct manner select English Essays.
When they can read English with fluency and write fairly and legibly, Students shall begin to learn the Latin language on the following plan, to Wit. Ruddiman's Rudiments, Cordery, Erasmus, Eutropius, Cornelius Nepos, with translations; Cæsar's Commentaries & Salust without translations; but when the Parent or Guardian of the Student shall choose it the whole of these Authors shall be read with translations, Kennett's Roman Antiquities to be studied at the same time. When they can render Eutropius into correct English & explain the Government and connection of the words; then the Students shall commence the Study of the French Language on the following plan, to Wit,

Page 204
Grammar, Telamachus, Cyrus, Gil-blas. If the Student is to be taught the Greek Language he will read The Greek Grammar, The Gospels in Greek.
The Rudiments of Geography on the plan of Guthrie.
After the Student commences the Study of the French Language, the Study of the French & Latin Language shall be associated, and the time so appropriated to each, that the course in both may be finished nearly at the same time.
When the Greek Languge is Studied without the French the Student will commence it at the time prescribed for the French.
When the Latin, Greek, and French are all directed to be studied, the Study of Greek shall then commence so that the Student may be able to Read the Gospels in Greek and Translate them correctly when he finishes his course in the Preparatory School.
The English exercises shall be regularly continued, this Language being always considered as a primary object, and the other Languages but Auxiliaries.
Any of the Languages (the English excepted) may be omitted if the Parent or Guardian of the Student shall so direct.

The Plan of Education under the Professorships of the University.

First—The President


Page 205
    Rhetoric & Belles lettres.
    Rhetoric on the plan of Sheridan.
    Belles Lettres, on the plan of Blair and Rollin

Professorships.

First—Professor of Moral and political Philosophy and History.

Moral and political Philosophy by the Study of the following Authors.

    Paley's Moral & political Philosophy.
    Montesquiu's Spirit of Laws.
    Civil Government & political Constitutions.
    Adams' Defence & De Lolme
    The Constitutions of the United States.
    The Modern Constitution of Europe.
    The Law of Nations.
    Vattell's Law of Nations.
    Burlamaquis principals of Natural and Political law.

History.

    Priestley's Lectures on History and General policy.
    Millots Ancient and Modern History.
    Hume's History of England with Smollets continuation.
    Chronology on the most approved plan.
Second—Professor of Natural philosophy, Astronomy and Geography.
Natural philosophy under the following heads:General properties of Matter
Laws of Motion Geography
Mechanical powers The Use of the Globes
Hydrostatics The Geometrical, political & Commercial relations of the different Nations of the Earth
Hydraulics

Page 206
Pneumatics
Optics Astronomy on the plan of Furgerson
Electricity
Magnestism
Third—Professor of Mathematics.
    Arithmetic in a Scientific manner
    Algebra, and the application of Algebra to Geometry.
    Euclid's Elements
    Trigonometry and the application of Trigonometry to the Mensuration of heights and distances, of Surfaces & Solids, and Surveying and Navigation

Thus far shall be the regular course of Study. The remainder may be taught if requested.

    Conic Section
    The Doctrine of the Sphere & Sylinder
    The projection of the Sphere
    Spherical Trigonometry
    The doctrine of fluxions
    The doctrine of chances & Annuities
Fourth—Professor of Chymistry & the Philosophy of Medicine, Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts.
    Chymistry upon the most approved plan.
Fifth—Professor of Languages.

The English language

    Elegant Extracts in prose and verse
    Scott's Collection

Latin Language

    VirgilCicero's Orations—Horaces Epistles including his Art of Poetry.

Page 207

Greek Language

    Lucian. Xenophon.
The Professor of Languages to attend when required, the Reading of Cicero de officiis, and Horace & Livy in the Latin language Longinus on the Sublime and the Orations of Demosthenes & Homer's Iliad in Greek.
The Rudiments of Language are still to be attended to; the different forms and the figure of Speech will be noticed by the Professor, and Comments made on the Sentiments and beauties of the Authors; parallel Sentences quoted; particular idioms observed; and all allusions to distant Customs and manners explained.
The Students under the 5th Professorship shall deliver twice a Week, to the Professor of Languages an English translation from some of the Latin or Greek Classics, in which, after expressing the sence of the Author, the Spirit and eligance of the translation are principally to be regarded.

The Students of the other Classes shall every Saturday deliver to the President an English composition on a subject of their own chusing, and he shall correct the Errors in Orthography, Grammar, Style or Sentiment, and make the necessary Observations thereon when he returns the Composition to the Writer.
A Student who shall pass an approved examination upon the Exercises of the Preparatory School shall be admitted upon the general establishment of the University.

Page 208
Any Candidate shall be admitted into the University to attend the Classes of Rhetoric and Belles-lettres or as a Student under any of the three first Professorships who shall pass an approved examination upon the English language, the four first rules of Arithmetic, and the Rule of Three.
Any person may also be admitted as a Student under the fifth Professorship who can pass an approved examination on the English language and render Cæsars Commentaries & Salust into English & explain the Government & connection of the words.
No specific Qualifications are required for a Student under the fourth Professorship alone.
The Preparatory School shall be considered as a branch of the Institution, and in all respects under the direction and regulation of the Trustees.
That the present Students who are not qualified to be entered on the General Establishment of the University, shall be Arranged to the Preparatory School & placed under the direction of the Tutors appointed to that part of the Institution.
That the Studies and exercises of these Students be so arranged after the next vacation as to remedy the defects of their past education, & come as nearly and as early as possible to the plan prescribed by the Board.
Resolved that the said plan of Education be referred back to the same Committee to draw an Ordinance to carry the same into effect.
. . .