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Title: Letter from James Johnston Pettigrew to Ebenezer Pettigrew, February 21, 1847: Electronic Edition.
Author: Pettigrew, James Johnston, 1828-1863
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Brian Dietz
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 9K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-08-01, Brian Dietz finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Pettigrew Family Papers (#592), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from James Johnston Pettigrew to Ebenezer Pettigrew, February 21, 1847
Author: J. Johnston Pettigrew
Description: 2 pages, 3 page images
Note: Call number 592 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
Page images can be viewed and compared in parallel with the text.
Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
All em dashes are encoded as —.
Indentation in lines has not been preserved.

For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from James Johnston Pettigrew to Ebenezer Pettigrew , February 21, 1847
Pettigrew, James Johnston, 1828-1863



Page 1
C. Hill, Feb. 21st 1847

Dear Pa,

I recieved your letter 4 days ago and am very much obliged to you for your kind permission, to go to Norfolk. But as I intend that to be the very last resort and since I am a great deal better, I shall not avail myself of the present opportunity, and am in hopes that it will not be necessary at all.
From the tener of your letter, it seems to me that I have been the unintentional cause of offence to you. Nothing could give me more sorrow; and I assure you, that is a source of great mortification to apply myself closely to my studies, to be strict in morals and to attempt a faithful discharge of my duties, and then to fail to give satisfaction, when nothing would afford me more pleasure than to do so, and when there are many others who are idle, prodigal, dissipated and yet seem to give perfect satisfaction. Of course, it is not my wish to appear, in the slightest degree whatever, censorial, but merely to show, as far as words can, that I know, what is right, if I know not how to perform it. I rest, however, in the full confidence, that after June, I may be able to minister to the cares of your declining age, in such a manner, as such a father as you have a right to expect from all your children. I am fully conscious, of having done many, countless improper actions, but let this be a partial extenuation, that a sojourn of two years and a half in a place like this, is enough to ruin a saint much more a mortal.
A short time ago, I recieved a very agreeable letter from Mr. Bingham.

Page 2
He doubtless had some motive for writing it, but what that motive may have been, I am unable to conjecture. I consider it in the light of a great favor, and shall remember his advice with peculiar pleasure.
Please give my love to brother Charles and brother William

and believe me to be your affectionate son

J. Johnston Pettigrew .


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