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Title: Letter from Thomas L. Spragins to his brother, Mel Spragins, September 22, 1808: Electronic Edition.
Author: Spragins, Thomas L.
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Stephanie Adamson
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 12K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-02-16, Stephanie Adamson finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: University of North Carolina Miscellaneous Personal Papers (#3129), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from Thomas L. Spragins to his brother, Mel Spragins, September 22, 1808
Author: Thos L. Spragins
Description: 3 pages, 4 page images
Note: Call number 3129 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
Page images can be viewed and compared in parallel with the text.
Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
All em dashes are encoded as —.
Indentation in lines has not been preserved.

For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from Thomas L. Spragins to his brother, Mel Spragins, September 22, 1808
Spragins, Thomas L.



Page [1]
Chapel Hill Sept 22nd 1808

Dear Brother,

I assure you that nothing of a similar nature could have given me more pleasure than yours by the Mail—But I deem it unnecessary to discribe to you my feelings on finding that Mother and the rest of the Family were usually well, for you will readily conclude that such news are interesting and excite almost inexpressible delight to one in my situation. You wish to be informed what Class I have joined and what are my present studes. Sir when I first came to this place I was very much devided in my mind what class to join, but after mature consideration I found it most expedient to join the members of the Sophemore Class which studies Latin, Greek, and Geography I first concluded to commence the junior studies but was doubtful that I should be inadequate to the task, in consequence of not being as far advanced as they were; and in case I could not make up some of thoes studies should not be able to graduate, which I look forward to. Thus Mel. having informed you relative to my standing in College, I will proceed to acquaint you of other things which may occur to my recollection as I continue to write.

Page [2]
No doubt but what you would be fond to know how I am pleased with Chapel Hill. I find my situation tolerable agreeable, and probably as much so here as it would be at any other seminary The Students as you would naturally conclude are of various discriptions; some are young men of good information and quite agreeable, others again are to the contrary of this. Richard Logan agreeable to your expectation have become a Student at this place and is also a room mate of mine. Among the avantages at this place are the two Societies which is an advantage peculiar Chapel Hill, all transactions performed in each society are kept in profound secrecy we have some of the most distinguished men in the State in our Society which is the Dialectic, and from the decorum which exist in it, and the worthy members which composes it and also the information which it affords, it even merits the attention of Sages. The Library belonging to this Society exclusive of that which belong to to the University cost $1500 which is the best by far that I ever saw.

Page [3]
The way the Students get their studies are different from any other seminary, for there is such emulation existing among them, especially between thoes of the [unrecovered] Societies that they get their studies almost entirely by memory, which has an attency to excite ambitions in all of them and makes their stud [unrecovered] though in getting them so they have to [unrecovered] use of more industry, therefore it keeps us generally [unrecovered] busy. Give my Love to all the fimily and in [unrecovered] Mother that I am better satisfyed sonsidering [unrecovered] every thing than I expected when I first came here, and hope that this will find her enjoying a better state of health than when I left home. Write to me the first opportunity and let me know all the news which you may think worthy to put in a letter, and except this from your ever Loving brother

Thos L. Spragins

Wm. Mel Spragins


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