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Title: To the Young Gentlemen of the University of North-Carolina, May 28, 1834: Electronic Edition.
Author: No Author
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text scanned (OCR) by Brian Dietz
Images scanned by Brian Dietz
Text encoded by Brian Dietz
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 10K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2006-02-06, Brian Dietz finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of document: To the Young Gentlemen of the University of North-Carolina, May 28, 1834
Author: No Author
Description: 1 page, 1 page image
Note: Call number VCp378 US copy 1 (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
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To the Young Gentlemen of the University of North-Carolina, May 28, 1834
No Author



Page 1
To the Young Gentlemen of the University of North-Carolina.
CHAPEL HILL, May 28th, 1834.
PERMIT, my dear young friends, one who sincerely wishes you well, one who feels anxious for the credit of the University and of the State, to address you seriously and affectionately on some points touching the decorum of Collegiate manners.
1. Let me ask you whether you do not think it becomes you as young gentlemen, as sons and representatives of some of the first families of this and other States, to cultivate civility and refinement of maners?
2. Let me ask you whether such conduct as was witnessed last night, the hissing and other expressions of contempt towards a decent and civil stranger, who was entertaining us with delightful music, together with the shoutings that ensued after leaving the house, comported with that character which you would wish to sustain with the world as gentlemen of polished manners and refined education?
3. Let me conjure you to consider whether the practice so common, of indulging in loud vociferations in all your hours of amusement, be not calculated to injure delicacy and refinement of manners, and to cherish a coarseness and vulgarity, not harmonizing with academic life and intellectual dignity?
4. Will not these things, witnessed by strangers passing thro' our village, strike them with an unfavorable opinion of us, and send abroad an ill report of the prevailing gentility of Chapel Hill?
5. As many of you doubtless exremely disapprove and regret such proceedings, can you do nothing to put a stop to them? Is there not a sufficient predominance of good sense and good taste in your body, to frown out of countenance these rough and turbulent manners?
6. Is it not highly incumbent on the more considerate students, to endeavour to resue themselves and the College from the public reproach and scandal which must fall with indiscriminate severity upon the whole body, if these things are not checked?
7. If a stranger enters your rooms, he is treated with marked politeness. Why not carry out into all your public conduct the same character of genteel breeding and urbane manners? Surely the ornamental qualities ought to be cultivated at your time of life, and go hand in hand with the more solid attainments. Surely the bloom and gaiety of youth would receive embellishment from gentleness, grace and dignity of behaviour.
8. Let me remind you, that the evil of which I complain, is becoming so common as to characterize almost every public meeting, not specially for sacred purposes—showing a disregard to the presence not only of the officers of the College, but even of the fair sex; so as to threaten an exclusion of ladies from our assemblies, lest they should encounter these stormy proceedings. Is the enjoyment of wit and pleasantry impossible without noise; and is it necessary to he boisterous in order to he happy?
The writer of these remarks is uncertain whether they will be favorably received by you, and whether they will have any effect in correcting the evil which he sees and deplores. Conscious, however, of the best motives; conscious of having at heart your present respectability, and that of the College where you are training up for your friends and your country, he feels impelled to make the attempt; hoping that this appeal will not be in vain, and that the result will prove he has not a higher opinion of your good sense and good feeling than they deserve.