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Title: Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, April 20, 1862 : Electronic Edition.
Author: Henderson, John, fl. 1863
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Caitlin R. Donnelly
Text encoded by Caitlin R. Donnelly
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 12K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-05-23, Caitlin R. Donnelly finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: John Steele Henderson Papers (#327), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, April 20, 1862
Author: John
Description: 4 pages, 4 page images
Note: Call number 327 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
Page images can be viewed and compared in parallel with the text.
Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
All em dashes are encoded as —.
Indentation in lines has not been preserved.

For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from John Henderson to his mother, Mary Ferrand Henderson, April 20, 1862
Henderson, John, fl. 1863



Page [1]
Chapel Hill Apr 20 / 62

Dear Mother

Len arrived here Friday morning rather unexpectedly to me, as I did not expect him until Saturday. I was exceedingly glad to see him. He appears to be in excellent health, looks better than I ever saw him before. Camp life certainly agrees with him. I believe it would bring me out too, and if Len's company is exchanged, I expect, with Father's approbation to enter the army about the first of July. My mind is continually

Page [2]
following our armies, and I must confess that, although, the victory at Shiloh was a great one, yet we are in a desperate situation. McClellan is in the "peninsula" with a numerous and well appointed army, and if he defeats our generals in a pitched battle, Virginia will be evacuated by the armies of the confederacy. May God nerve our men for the fight and give our armies the victory! If Jeff Davis is on the field I dont see how it is possible for our armies to be defeated. Upon that remarkable man, the mention of whose name makes every true southern throb with delight, the Soldiers

Page [3]
look upon almost as a demigod. Let him once address himself to them, and show them that he feels for them like a Father does for his children; that done, our army is invincible. I believe I received every thing mentioned in your letter I believe. Does Father think there will be an exchange of prisoners shortly? Len is anxious for another fight. Chapel Hill will soon be deserted; the Conscription takes about three fourths. When the number of Students is reduced to twenty five or thirty, I intend to come home. I expect to remain here until the end of the session. Governor Swain has nearly

Page [4]
run crazy about it. I, verily, believe it will kill him, if colege is broken up. I dont know, what the Professors are going to do for a living. Len leaves tonight for Wilmington. He will start about twelve Oclock. The money came very opportunely as Guthrie has been dunning me. Love to all.

Your aff son

John



P. S.
There is no Physician by the name of Hollister in Chapel Hill. Perhaps he has gone to the war. I had another chill on Monday.

J S H