Documenting the American South Logo
powered by google
Legend Informational Note
See the Page Image
     Mouseover Available
Title: Letter from John Henderson to his father, Archibald Henderson, from Fort Branch, [February 1865] : Electronic Edition.
Author: Henderson, John, fl. 1863
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Caitlin R. Donnelly
Text encoded by Caitlin R. Donnelly
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 12K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-05-27, Caitlin R. Donnelly finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: John Steele Henderson Papers (#327), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from John Henderson to his father, Archibald Henderson, from Fort Branch, [February 1865]
Author: John
Description: 2 pages, 2 page images
Note: Call number 327 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
Page images can be viewed and compared in parallel with the text.
Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
All em dashes are encoded as —.
Indentation in lines has not been preserved.

For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from John Henderson to his father, Archibald Henderson, from Fort Branch, [February 1865]
Henderson, John, fl. 1863



Page [1]
Damp and wet as they were sleep over took me and it was an effectual protection against the cold. Perhaps "effectual" is too strong a term; for I feel more indebted to Dr Kennedy's blankets than to anything else and to use his own expression "They feel very comfortable of a warm night. The march from Tarboro was painful and toilsom in the extreme. The distance is twenty three miles and we began it yesterday about twelve Oclock. The stragglers were innumerable but I was not one of them; far from it I arrived at the fort about eight Oclock last night. Most of [unrecovered] men camped on the way and did not arrive here until noon to-day. I like the life of a soldier very well so far but of course it will be some time before any decisive judgment can be arrived at. There is something romantic about the life; the mode of life; the cause he is contending for. He has to bear with every species of inconvenience; to live well or ill is with him the same. What difference does it make whether he is furnished with a pound or a quarter of a pound of meat a day. One third of a pound is the usual allowance. If they draw five days rations they eat it up in two. But starvation: they dont starve Well how do they live? Dont ask me; they can tell you more about it. Soldiers can eat anything and relish it too. While at Fort Clifton I was

Page [2]
astonished at seeing men eat beef which smelled so very offensive. The stench was intolerable. But yet it was eaten. I have met several of my old friends and acquaintance, companions of school and college days. Adams, Gardiner, Brookfield and myself mess together and will share the same quarters as soon as we become comfortably situated. Fort Branch is jammed. Our company will remain here but a few days. Already it has been ordered to Weldon and will probably leave here for that point the latter part of the present week. Lieut. Primrose is not here; stays at home on furlough nearly all the while; should have returned to the Fort today. If you can find a Richmond paper containing accounts the full account of the late tremendous mass meeting in that city, you will confer a great favor upon me by forwarding it. If it is to be found you need be in no hurry to forward it to me until it is positively known where I am to be stationed permanently. Give my love to Mother, my cousins, and the little ones and my respects to Miss Gilpin. I have written a long letter though labouring under many disadvantages and though it may be unsatisfactory, still it is the best I can do under the circumstances. As soon as I am stationed somewhere permanently I will write oftener and better. Forgot to mention that I saw Stephen in Raleigh With my best wishes for your health I remain very affectionately

Your Son

John