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Title: Letter from Charles P. Mallet to Henry A. London, April 30, 1865: Electronic Edition.
Author: Mallet, Charles Peter, 1792-1873
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Bari Helms
Text encoded by Sarah Ficke
First Edition, 2005
Size of electronic edition: ca. 10K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2005
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2005-10-19, Sarah Ficke finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Charles B. Mallet Papers (#3165), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from Charles P. Mallet to Henry A. London, April 30, 1865
Author: C. P. Mallet
Description: 2 pages, 2 page images
Note: Call number 3165 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
Page images can be viewed and compared in parallel with the text.
Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
All em dashes are encoded as —.
Indentation in lines has not been preserved.

For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from Charles P. Mallet to Henry A. London, April 30, 1865
Mallet, Charles Peter, 1792-1873



Page 1
Chapel Hill 30th April 65

H. A. London Esqr

My Dear Sir

You will oblige me very much by having the parcel sent you herewith, forwarded to my son, from whom I have not heard for more than three weeks. The Yankees have held possession of our village for fourteen days, and we see no indications of them moving. They have not on the whole behaved badly in the village where we have a safe guard, but in the country they have done badly, pillaging of every thing they could carry off. I have not heard of any cases of the loss of cattle, sheep or hogs — but the country is stripped of mules and horses. I cannot give you later news than you will have had from paroled soldiers from Lee and Johnson's Army. The Yankee dispatches announce the fall of Mobile with capture of Forrest — and the capture of Macon and release of all prisoners at that place, and also of Salisbury, with prisoners and all the Quarter Masters stores sent from Raleigh so! that it is vain to disguise the fact of subjugation but that is preferable to having been Legislated into submission by the Holden faction. by the bye, I hear it

Page 2
as coming from Gen. Atkins , that Holden is to be our Provincial Govr extending the lines over half of South Carolina — the other portion of S.C. to be annexed to Georgia, thus obliterating the state lines of S.C. Kilpatrick was here yesterday and had a grand review, which I did not see. The Yankees are running the cars daily from Morehead City and probably from Wilmington to Durham and probably further up the road. They have a daily mail and forward any letters without inspection. I have a man and horse billeted upon me and if they continue to remain my supplies will be exhausted. They seem to dissuade negroes from going off. Nevertheless they go in large numbers.
My love to Fannie and Lizzie, and my high regards to Mrs. London.

Very truly yours

C. P. Mallett .