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Title: Letter from Thomas Ruffin, Jr. to his father, Thomas Ruffin, January 1841: Electronic Edition.
Author: Ruffin, Thomas, Jr.
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Caitlin R. Donnelly
Text encoded by Caitlin R. Donnelly
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 16K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-03-03, Caitlin R. Donnelly finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Thomas Ruffin Papers (#641), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from Thomas Ruffin, Jr. to his father, Thomas Ruffin, January 1841
Author: Thomas Ruffin
Description: 3 pages, 4 page images
Note: Call number 641 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 5 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.
Page images can be viewed and compared in parallel with the text.
Any hyphens occurring in line breaks have been removed, and the trailing part of a word has been joined to the preceding line.
All quotation marks, em dashes and ampersand have been transcribed as entity references.
All double right and left quotation marks are encoded as ".
All single right and left quotation marks are encoded as '.
All em dashes are encoded as —.
Indentation in lines has not been preserved.

For more information about transcription and other editorial decisions, see the section Editorial Practices.
Letter from Thomas Ruffin, Jr. to his father, Thomas Ruffin , January 1841
Ruffin, Thomas, Jr.



Page [1]
Chapel Hill Jan 1841

My dear Father

I have received both the coat and your letter and I am thankful to you for your advice, which you gave me The coat is too large, but I will keep it thinking that it will not be so next winter. I braught Brother Sterling's down with me.
I keeped my same room, and my room mate is Allen Polk from Ten. I have seen Mr Green and he both asked me to come to see him and promised to come himself to see us, he is very fond of Allen and very kind to both of us.
Dr Michel has imposed a fine on his boarders, that unless they talk at the table they shall take a book and read for the benefit of the crowd. He also is a very hospital man. A great many of our old students quit and nearly all those who were dismissed last session returned this. They came in very slowly this session and in fact they are not all back yet.
I will write home next saturday to Mama

Page [2]
I suppose you know that Mr Foust went to Favetteville and Mama sent for her things by him instead of Nathan who did not know when he would go down.
Dr Mitchel has filled his ice house already I have writen to James McNeill about his pecuniary affairs. Robbert Strange has not returned yet wether he will or not I do not know for a certenty, but rather expect he will. There were but very few new candidates for admission into college.
I have not heard from home this session but expect you have for when I left home I saw Paty prepareing a letter to you. I did not stop long in Hillsbo. but I saw Uncle John and Brother Brown and they said all were well.
As I have a quiet room and room mate I hope to be able to get a distinction in my class My dear Father I trying my best I have studed harder this session than I ever did in my life before, so that if I now I fail for ever, but I have strong hopes of success. I know the importance of knowledge and I now much your happiness depends upon me, and I also that it is

Page [3]
nescessary for me to have and education for I will have so many to take care off for Brother Brown and myself will have to take care of all the younger and poor Brother Sterling.
And as soon as we are able to work My dear Father I want you to rest for I think you will have done enough for ungratefull children.
Sir and all I want you to give me is your books for they will be distroy unless some perticular person has them and want them for John and for my own instruction and as a relick of the family. Sir I have been wishing to ask you for them a long but could not for you know a youth dislikes to meddle with his parents affairs.
It is now nearly 11 oclock and we are all. Give my best love to Mrs. Tailor and my respects to Miss Elenor Boylan and Miss Mildred Cameron.
Mr Green returned from Mr Cameron's last night and left all well there.

I remain your affectionate Son

Thomas Ruffin


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