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Title: Letter from Thomas Ruffin, Jr. to his father, Thomas Ruffin, May 11, 1841 : Electronic Edition.
Author: Ruffin, Thomas, Jr.
Funding from the University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill supported the electronic publication of this title.
Text transcribed by Bari Helms
Images scanned by Caitlin R. Donnelly
Text encoded by Mike Millner
First Edition, 2007
Size of electronic edition: ca. 16K
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2007
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text
The electronic edition is a part of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2007-03-15, Mike Millner finished TEI/XML encoding.
Source(s):
Title of collection: Thomas Ruffin Papers (#641), Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title of document: Letter from Thomas Ruffin, Jr. to his father, Thomas Ruffin, May 11, 1841
Author: Thomas Ruffin
Description: 3 pages, 4 page images
Note: Call number 641 (Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Editorial practices
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Originals are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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Letter from Thomas Ruffin, Jr. to his fatherThomas Ruffin , May 11, 1841
Ruffin, Thomas, Jr.



Page [1]
Chapel Hill May 11th 1841

My Dear Father

I must beg your pardon for my long delay in giving an answer to your letter. which I received in the due course of the mail. But I have a good excuse for it, Namely, you stated in your letter your intention of going to Rockingham & I did not know when you would return, And as Sister Alice told me in her letter received yesterday that you had returned, I immediately sat down to give you the satisfaction, which I know you will experience, when you learn, that I am perfectly willing to remain a boarder at Dr Mitchels.
That Dr M. had no intention of hurting my feelings I am certain, for he has never ceased to show that kindness to me yet, for which I ought to be & will be, under obligations to him as long as I live, And I assure you I ask his pardon, for accuseing him when inocent, of an action unbecoming to a gentleman, And I have found out, since my letter, that he did not ask all of the boarders, but only the seniors, of which I was ignorant for I was told by one of the young men that it was the case. Therefore I hope you will forgive me for the anxiety I have given you, concerning an action

Page [2]
which I regret ever happened, but for one thing i.e. it gave you occasion to write to me, a thing so seldom done, that I am willing to undergo any thing almost for it,
I suppose you saw John Brodn. at his Fathers, for he left here more than a week ago & I have a boy by the name of Caldwell for my room mate,
Mr Green has been absent now, for more than a week, on a visit to Wilmington at which place the convention meets. He will deliver a eulogy on Gen. Harrison next friday, on account of that we will have that day given to us as a holiday.
We have only seven more days to study, for the examination commences week after next and we have the last day given to us also according to custom.
I am sorry to tell you that my knee is swolen again, but alas! it is too true. It is more so than ever and gives me more pain, & I can scarcely walk up the stair steps, & I begin to fear it is not the rheumatism, for if you recolect, I fell & hurt it the last session, & it has been sweled ever since that more or less,
You will please to tell Sister Alice, that I received her letter and the book she sent also, but that the one belonging to the Philanthropic society did not come to me, & she did not send me the shos of which I told her I was in need & Papa I whish you would send me a pair of those I left at home, for I have on a pair of my

Page [3]
roommates, which I know is against your rules, but I was compeled for I wore mine untill they had no soles in them.
Tell Ma. that I have no vest for commencement & that she promised to make me one las vacation & that I am very much obliged to her for the shirts she is haveing made for me.
Sister Alice mentioned that the boys would stay untill the vacation. What will you do with them after that.
Give my very best respects for I can not say love now a days to Miss Mildred Cameron but my love to all the rest. & tell Cousin [unrecovered] that she is very much envied here, for Papa showed the letter I wrote to [unrecovered] Dr Mitchel when he was there & he came home & told all the contents to the young ladies. & as a matter of course, they are angry with her.
I promise you to carry home the book, which I will use next session & I will make use of them in the vacation.
I am glad to hear that Mr Brodnax & family intend coming to see John graduate & I hope you, Mama, & Sister Alice will accompany them but tell Mama that I will comply with her whish as to the girls.
There is nothing else to tell you now, But I will write before long

I remain your affectionate Son

Thomas Ruffin


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