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William Bradley Umstead, 1895-1954
Four-Leaf Clover.
From the William B. Umstead World War I Collection
North Carolina Collection Gallery, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

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Source Description
Title:
Four-Leaf Clover.
Date:
1917.
Call Number:
CK.621.190
North Carolina Collection Gallery, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Physical Description:

FOUR-LEAF CLOVER, good-luck token, genuine botanical specimen fixed and pressed to paper under strips of cellophane tape, "BEST OF LUCK" stamped in black ink; 3.0" (7.6 cm) square; tape very yellowed.

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Notes:

Soldiers throughout history have attempted to safeguard themselves with a variety of tokens, charms, and religious symbols. Umstead was no exception. Found among his World War I keepsakes was this four-leaf clover. Presumably, the young Tar Heel lieutenant carried it with him during his military service. Cellophane was still a relatively new product at the start of World War I. The invention of the thin, flexible film is attributed to a Swiss engineer, who by 1912 was marketing it for a number of uses. Among its first military applications was use in early gas masks.

Funding from the State Library of North Carolina supported the electronic publication of this title.