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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Margaret Skinner Parker, March 7, 1976. Interview H-0278. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Gathering with friends to make and listen to music

Young people today do not know how to have a good time, Parker asserts. She remembers gathering with friends to make and listen to music.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Margaret Skinner Parker, March 7, 1976. Interview H-0278. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

W. WELDON HUSKE:
What did you do on a date? I mean, what was social life like?
MARGARET SKINNER PARKER:
Well, that's a good question. Well now, really young people today don't know how to have a good time like we did. There weren't anything for maybe six of us (three couples) to get in a car and maybe go over there and sit on the rocks, you know, at the dam, and sit there and sing and all like that.
W. WELDON HUSKE:
And was the park up on the hill ever used?
MARGARET SKINNER PARKER:
That was there. And Mr. C.E.B., in the summertime they had what they called a vesper services up on Park Hill. You know they had a bandstand up there.
W. WELDON HUSKE:
What was it like?
MARGARET SKINNER PARKER:
Well, just like any that you've seen in parks.
MRS. ISAAC HALL HUSKE:
It was like a little round pavillion-type thing on top of the hill.
W. WELDON HUSKE:
Then the mill owned it, then?
MARGARET SKINNER PARKER:
Oh yes, they owned that land. And they used to have services up there, all the churches together.
MRS. ISAAC HALL HUSKE:
And then on Sunday afternoon they'd have band concerts, and the people would gather around and listen.
W. WELDON HUSKE:
Well, who made up the band?
MARGARET SKINNER PARKER:
We had a band made up of local people.