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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Latrelle McAllister, June 25, 1998. Interview K-0173. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Growing up near West Charlotte High School

In this excerpt, McAllister remembers growing up near West Charlotte High School and anticipating enrolling there. Integration threatened her hopes, but she squeaked into the redrawn district and realized her desire to go to school there.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Latrelle McAllister, June 25, 1998. Interview K-0173. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

So, you started by saying you grew up just a few blocks from the school? LATRELLE MCALLISTER: About three blocks. PG: Lived there ever since you were born. LM: Ever since I was born, within shouting distance. Had the opportunity to play on the playground just below West Charlotte. Really, all my life, really, looked forward to going there. PG: Oh really. LM: Yes. PG: On this playground would there be kids in the neighborhood? LM: Neighborhood children. There’s a community center just below the school. So, we would play there. I went to Girl Scouts right across the street from West Charlotte High School. Just this long--. Well, all of my life was a part of our heritage, a part of the neighborhood. And, actually, most of my friends’ parents went to school there, too. It was just for me a no-brainer, as they say, that that is where I would go to school. When integration came about—I believe in 1971 or 1972—some of the young people in our neighborhood went to West Mecklenberg. But, as fate would have it, I was on the dividing line, I guess, for West Charlotte. I think Senior Drive was the dividing line. So, there was never a question about where I would go to high school.